LEED Rating System Selection Q&A

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Architect, Sustainability Project Manager AlfaTech Timmons Mar 10 2010 Guest
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Is there a written guideline about which LEED 2009 rating system to use for a specific project? I want to have something written (in PDF or Word) w/o getting onto LEED Online to go through the rating system selector. I need this to send it to a client.

LEEDuser Editor's note: This single forum questiion has turned into the principle place on LEEDuser where questions of rating system selection are discussed. Please post your questions and answers below! Most questions can be resolved by referring to USGBC's rating system selection guidance.

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Sara Greenwood Green Building Consultant Cadmus Group
Apr 14 2015
Guest
104 Thumbs Up

Does CI fit into BD+C?

Project Location: United States

Hello, I am developing TI Guidelines for unfinished retail space in a building pursuing BD+Cv2009. Can the future tenant pursue CI?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 6509 Thumbs Up

Hi Sara,
If you mean a C&S project, then yes the tenant can pursue a CI for their tenant improvement. If you mean a NC project, then no. The tenant requirements are necessary for the whole building to get the certification. The good news is that the future tenant will be part of the building that got certified so they will share in it.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Apr 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 1354 Thumbs Up

Michelle, I don't know if I agree. The LI that requires the tenant guidelines for non-CS projects (LI 10102) only notes that the guidelines are required and that the base building cannot achieve any ID point for developing the guideline. It specifically notes that the tenant is not bound by the owner's letter of commitment/required to meet the same requirements. While the guidelines are required for the non-CS base building, they are not something that the tenants are required to actually follow.

As such, it would appear to me that tenants could achieve CI (or CI-Retail in this case) in the future provided that they could demonstrate compliance with all of the prerequisites and MPR requirements. Given that the tenant guidelines are supposed to specifically speak to how tenants could achieve CI certification, it just seems counter-intuitive to me that USGBC would not allow those spaces to certify.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 15 2015 LEEDuser Member 6509 Thumbs Up

Hi Kristina,
You have a good point. We've been doing these so long that despite at least two dozen projects that use tenant guidelines both C&S and NC, I don't remember closely examining this LI. So thanks for the pointer, but I admit I'm more confused now that I've read it closely.

Overall, I think you are right and whether the project is NC or C&S, the tenant build out is able to go for LEED-CI if they so desire. It makes a little less sense to me with an NC project but that appears to be the case. So I retract my statement above.

However, I do not understand at all the idea that a tenant build out is different than an owner build out. Or that a tenant is not required to follow the guidelines. We have always generated our guidelines based on the idea that the whole building cannot claim credit for something that the whole building is not doing. So we have always believed that a tenant is required to fulfill the same obligations that the Owner indicates will be fulfilled by the build out, whoever is performing it ultimately.

Thanks for the correction. I learn something new that I thought I knew in LEED every day.

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Ulrika Nobelius White Arkitekter AB
Apr 09 2015
LEEDuser Member
20 Thumbs Up

Tricky project - NC, C&S or EBOM?

Project Location: Sweden

Hi

We have a eight storey office building that will undergo a larger Core and Shell refurbishment; windows will be changed, the building is u-shaped and the "interior courtyard will be enclosed by glasing - and turned into a wintergarden, inside all HVAC and electrical fittings will be replaced. 1,5 floors will be exluded regarding HVAC and electrical, in these untouched floors the tenants will remain.
One floor will be used as an evacuation plan while the rest of the building is being refurbished.
On the top 2,5 floors the tenant is known and is working with his own tenant fitout. It is not certain whether the fitout will be a part of the construction of the Core and Shell project or if it will be a seperate contract.
Our first thought was that it should be a C&S, but now I'm wondering if NC would be more suitable? Or should it be a EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.? But in any case how do we handle the floors where nothing is done? Could they be excluded? The developer intends to renovate these areas as well, but they don't know when that is going to happen, could be in two, five or three years, and once renovated they will meet at least the same standards as today.

Would be grateful for all advise on this matter!
Best Regards

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Fabio Frescia PM, LEED AP Arcadia (Thailand) Company Limited
Apr 01 2015
LEEDuser Member
11 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or EBOM ?

Hi,

We just got a project here in Thailand that just started, where our client would like to achieve a LEED certification.

It's an existing resort and they want to renovate it.

When I say renovate that means: all new layout, new HVAC systems (except they have bought a new water chilled system, that feeds all resort, 2 years ago, no need to replace it), new finishing, new lighting system, new furniture. Maintain the external walls and maybe renovate the façade.

It's an area of total 30,000 m2 and 17,500 m2 (that include 1,500 m2 of roads) will be renovated in 4 different phases, one phase per year, to be completed by 2018.

Does the project fall into NC or EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.?

Since it's a 4 phases project (Design is from March to May/ Construction is from June to September of each year, considered low season period) do I have consider this as a LEED Campus?

Please give me some advices.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

Hello Fabio,

The rating system selection guidance, found at: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-2009-rating-system-selection-guidance
provides a definition of "major renovation". Typically the extent and nature of the work is such that the primary function space cannot be used for its intended purpose while the work is in progress and where a new certificate of occupancy is required before the work area can be reoccupied.

From your description, I believe your project to be a Major Renovation, thus falling into the LEED for New Construction rating systems.

LEED Campus does not apply to phasing of a project rather it applies to scopes that include multiple projects on a shared site under the control of a single entity. Please note that projects that qualify for LEED Campus are not required to pursue this path.

Hope this helps.
Good Luck!

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Fabio Frescia PM, LEED AP, Arcadia (Thailand) Company Limited Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 11 Thumbs Up

Dear David,

Thank you very much for your reply. It was really helpful. So even if they are maintaining the core of the building and they have recently replaced the air chilled system with water chilled one, but since they will have to shut the building for the renovation and eventually issue a certificate of occupancy, then it falls under NC and Major Renovation.
Correct?

Thanks again!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

if the building will be shut for the renovation, and a certificate of occupancy is needed after the work is complete, then yes it would definately be a LEED for New Construction project.

For official guidance i would recommend contacting USGBC.
http://www.usgbc.org/contactus

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Adi Negara, LEED AP BD+C Green Building Facilitator PT. Indonesia Environment Consultant
Mar 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
763 Thumbs Up

Categorizing a LEED project

Project Location: Indonesia

Hello all,
I have a difficulty in determining the appropriate LEED rating system for a project, and I hope that you all can tell me what rating system is best suited to the project:

The project owner (say Company X), is planning to set an entirely new business (factory) in our country, but they haven't got the experience. On the other hand, Company Y, who runs the business in question, needed a new factory location, but don't have the fund. So Company X agreed to provide new location for Company Y, in exchange that they will help Company X in setting up the business, so it really is a win-win situation.

The plan is that the owner will build two buildings (each consists of factory and office space) in 2 phases. First is to construct building "A" designated for Company Y to operate, and in the next phase, building "B" will be built for Company X (owner). Both will have the same building design and floor area size.

So what is the appropriate LEED rating system for registering this project in the LEED online? Do we need to register it in two different NC projects or one under campus project? Does the first phase can be registered in NC or have to be in CS, since Company Y is not the owner and don't have the authority. And how about the certification fees for this?
Please share your opinion on this. Thanks.

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Adi Negara, LEED AP BD+C Green Building Facilitator, PT. Indonesia Environment Consultant Mar 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 763 Thumbs Up

There's a change in the plan, Building A and B will be constructed simultaneously, so what's the better rating system to be used, the Campus Approach or the Group Approach?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

From your description I believe the Campus approach to be the best way to streamline the certification.

I would also guess that LEED NC is the most applicable rating system to use for each building.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Mar 06 2015
LEEDuser Member
220 Thumbs Up

Eligibility for LEED - existing building structure

Project Location: Poland

Our client would like to certify a building that had its structural components and facade built a few years ago. The building however was never finished, there are no HVAC instalation and there are no interior finishes. Now they want to finish the building which means that there will be some internal works and instalation of HVAC systems. The envelope of the building won't be changed. Is this building eligible for LEED CS certification? Can we define the building as major renovation even though it was never used and there won't be any changes made to the building envelope?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

You could pursue CS if you don't build out the interior during this next phase.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 220 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your reply. So do you think we can define this building as "major renovation" eventhough we are not going to change anything in the building envelope?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

since the building was never complete it would not meet the definition of "major renovation".

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 220 Thumbs Up

Then should it be defined as a new building? The problem is that it was constructed a few years ago by a different company and I'm afraid that there would be problems with documenting the Prerequsite (SSp1) connected to construction activities which probably were not conducted according to LEED requirements.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

you are correct, documenting previous activities from different companies is difficult and in most cases impossible. most notably the documentation of an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan (SSp1) and the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project./BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. review of EAp1.

The best plan may be to contact the USGBC and see if you could "reset" this project prior to moving forward.

It would be benificial to all if you could post the USGBC response on this forum.

Good Luck!

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 2501 Thumbs Up

For what its worth, we had a similar situation and we decided to take the slow train: finish the building, wait 18 months and certify under LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. The strategy worked, and knowing we were going to certify under LEED EBOM really helped focus the remaining construction work so that we could maximise the outcome of the future certification.

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Isolda Strom
Mar 02 2015
Guest
33 Thumbs Up

Is C&S allowed if you are eligible for NC?

Project Location: Netherlands

We are in the very early stages of a project that is considering LEED certification. Demarcation is still unclear, but it the client is interested in all options. If a project has control over (a substantial part of) interior/ finishes, is it still permitted to pursue C&S certification instead of NC? Or must a project in that case certify under NC?

Many thanks!

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Mar 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Isolda,

CS versus NC certification is based mainly on the scope of work for the Owner/Developer. If the majority of the scope of work will be controlled by your client, then it is very likely that NC certification will be required. There are two posted rules about CS certification, one which involves a 50% rule and another that involves a 40%/60% rule - both say the same thing: If the Owner/Developer has control over the build-out for 50%, 60%, or more of the project, then the project cannot certify under Core and Shell. The LEED Reference Guide for BD+C outlines these thresholds. Hope this helps!

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Isolda Strom Mar 03 2015 Guest 33 Thumbs Up

Lauren,
Very helpful, thank you!

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Joel Cesare Sustainable Building Advisor City of Santa Monica
Feb 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
12 Thumbs Up

Can an existing tenant pursue LEED O+M?

A company that occupies an entire floor of an existing building has been in operation in this building over 2 years. They asked if they could get LEED Certification for their office. Is is possible to achieve an O+M certification for a tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

O+M is an entire building rating system, tenant spaces are not eligible.

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Devanand Ragbir Mechanical Engineer Devserv Ltd
Feb 05 2015
LEEDuser Member
20 Thumbs Up

Arrival of tenants in a LEED CS building

Our CS building is scheduled for commissioning end of August. Can tenants start outfitting their spaces before this date which will enable their employees to work from September. If this is possible, are their any limitation with respect to tenants occupancy before the building is complete.
Many Thanks

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 05 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

While not preferred, tenants can start outfitting their space before the commissioning occurs. If the tenant buildouts are under seperate contracts there are no limitation with respect to tenant occupancy before the building is complete. If the tenant buildouts are under the same contract as the Core & Shell work, and the tenant buildout work exceeds 50% of the total building floor area, then LEED for New Construction would need to be pursued.

hope this helps.

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Stella Stella
Feb 02 2015
Guest
241 Thumbs Up

Which LEED Rating system?

Hi, we are working on a project with integrated development, which houses a community park and a building with mixed use (commercial ,indoor & outdoor sports, library) in the same site. Which rating system should I use? Thanks.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 05 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

sounds like LEED NC. if there are multiple buildings you may be able to register a master site and group certify them.

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Stella Stella Feb 05 2015 Guest 241 Thumbs Up

Thanks!

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Juliane Muench
Jan 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
862 Thumbs Up

Is this project a CS project?

We are wondering if our building can be certified with CS: The building is a renovation project in which a developer is fundamentally refurbishing the building base systems and building shellThe exterior walls, roof, and lowest floor of a building, which serve to separate and protect the interior from the elements (precipitation, sunlight, wind, temperature variations)..
The building is mainly office building, a small part appr. 20% is occupied by a school.
The developer will not occupy a single sf in this building.
The fit-out will be done as tennants come in (for each tennant space at a time). The control over fit-out remains with the tennant and the developer builds the fit-out with his contractor according to tennant specs.
Would consider the project Core&Shell project? Or is a NC project since one contractor is performing Core, Shell and fit-out?
Thanks!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

20% occupied once renovation is done sounds like C&S to me. Doesn't matter if contractor is performing both C&S and tenant fit-out work.

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Juliane Muench Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 862 Thumbs Up

Hi David,
thanks a lot for your reply.
I might have expressed myself poorly, the building is not 20% occupied once renovated, but 20% is occupied by a school, and the rest will be offices. The building will probably be at least 50% occupied once renovated. Is there any applicable rule regarding choosing C&S VS NC on the percentage of occupation once built?
Thanks

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

Hello Juliane,
In that case you could choose NC. C&S is still applicable if the tenant fit-out is performed through a seperate contract, regardless if it is the same contractor.

The 40/60 rule of the Rating System Selection Guidance document outlines that more than rating system may apply. In cases as such project teams can choose which rating.

There is not an occupancy rule for NC or C&S, rather "how much will be built out during the certification" rule. Less than 50% built-out/occupied, i would choose C&S. More than 50% built-out/occupied, i would choose NC.

Hope this helps.

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Catherine Verdier Le Sommer Environnement
Jan 29 2015
Guest
11 Thumbs Up

BD+C Major Renovation or O+M Existing Buildings

Project Location: France

Hello,

The project I am working on is an existing office building, that will undergo renovation works and will have its entrance hall extended (the extension will be a little more than 1,000 sf).
The renovation works will include (amongst other things) the addition of renewable energy sources, replacement of lighting fixtures, enhancement of the ventilation network, and partial replacement of thermal insulation and roof watertightness.
Internal finishes will not be replaced, and the building will be occupied during the works.

Would BD+C Major Renovation or O+M Existing Buildings be more appropriate in this case?

Thanks in advance for your help.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 1699 Thumbs Up

Hi Catherine,

To be considered a major renovation the extent and nature of the work is such that primary function space cannot be used for its intended purpose while the work is in progress and where a new certificate of occupancy is required before the work area can be reoccupied.

The work you describe seems to border on "major renovation" however USGBC may require you to pursue EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. since the building will remain occupied during the renovation.

When you register the project on LEED Online you are asked a series of questions to determine the appropriate rating system. If one rating system cannot be clearly defined you will be provided with USGBC customer support to help in your selection process.

Hope this helps!

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Carlos Leignadier
Jan 21 2015
LEEDuser Member
9 Thumbs Up

What Rating System to use

Hi,
We are currently working on certifying a mall with the Core and Shell V2009 rating system. Inside this mall a supermarket will be located, and the client is asking if the supermarket can be certified, what rating system can I use in order to evaluate the feasibility of certifying the supermarket.
Thanks

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Jan 21 2015 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Carlos,

I would like into LEED-CI for Retail. This would likely be your best bet. Good luck!

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Juliane Muench
Jan 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
862 Thumbs Up

LEED Core&Shell?

Hi!
Our building is a renovation project in which the developer does a total refurbishment of building base systems and building shellThe exterior walls, roof, and lowest floor of a building, which serve to separate and protect the interior from the elements (precipitation, sunlight, wind, temperature variations)..
The building is mainly office building, a small part appr. 20% is occupied by a school.
The developer will not occupy a single sf in this building.
The fit-out will be done as tennants come in (for each tennant space at a time). The control over fit-out remains with the tennant and the developer builds the fit-out with his contractor according to tennant specs.
I am not sure weather it is core&shell or not and I might be in a grey zone, from what i understand from the comments in this forum.
So my first question is if you would consider the project Core&Shell.

We asked for a clarification of another topic on this project (CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide) and the answer also included a comment on the core &shell. "Core and Shell is the appropriate rating system to use if more than 40% of the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) is incomplete at the time of certification." We were asked to make sure weather Core &Shell is the right system. I have not seen this statement before and it does not make sense for me in this connection.
My second question is if you have seen in before and can make sense out of it in connection with Core&shell?

Thanks a lot in advance.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Jan 08 2015
LEEDuser Member
2814 Thumbs Up

CI vs NC

A project will do an interior fitout and change all systems but will not touch any façade element.
100 % of the project floor space is included in the project.
A NC rating system would be an appropriate rating system for the owner.
As an alternative, could the tenant (there is only 1 tenant in the building) pursue a CI certification or is the scope (because of MEP renovation) too large for that? Or is CI impossible because the scope concerns 100% of the floor space?

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Jan 07 2015
LEEDuser Member
335 Thumbs Up

Best way to document a building with multiple phases

Hello

I am currently working on a mixed-use campus project. This project will only be 1 building, however construction will be done in two phases. All the design work has already been completed. A majority of hte construction will be completed in one phase. The remained of the construction will be completed about 1 year after this.

What is the best way to handle this?

Would I still document it under the normal New Construction process with a design and construction phase submission? If so, I am worried about sitting on material/product submittals/info (MRc4,MRc5,IEQc4.1-44) for a year while we wait for phase 2 to be completed.

Has anyone encountered this before?

Thanks

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Jan 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Hi, Mike!

Most projects I have seen with multiple phases submit as a Standard Preliminary Review with the D+C phases combined once the project is complete. However, you are also able to submit for the Design phase, since this portion is complete, and then wait until Phase 2 construction is complete to submit for the Construction Preliminary Review. Some projects wait years to resubmit between the two phases. Which way you choose to go may depend on your contract for the project and/or timeline. Another option is to reach out to GBCI through their help link online and get in touch with someone there so you can hash out more specifics. Good luck!

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability, Solomon Cordwell Buenz Jan 07 2015 LEEDuser Member 335 Thumbs Up

I feared that this would be the answer. I have some concerns about sitting on construction info for a year after completion. If we need to elaborate or provide additional content due to LEED reviewer comment(s), it would be tough to back-track.

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Max Speigle
Jan 02 2015
LEEDuser Member
47 Thumbs Up

Dance School rating system: EB O+M School or not?

Hi All,
A dance school, one building- 90,000 SF is looking to get certified.
I am unsure if it will be EB O+M, or EB O+M Schools.
It is not k-12 and not a university.
It is a nonprofit dance school- it does collaborate with a college to give a Bachelor of Arts Degree.

I have asked USGBCI through this email 2 weeks ago: certinfo@gbci.org. I am waiting for a response. Any feedback is appreciated.

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MKK LEED
Dec 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
43 Thumbs Up

Core Learning Space implies use School LEED requirements?

Project Location: Colombia

Hi All,

I’m working in a LEED project that will be a building for the training of teachers, It is planned to have conferences, meetings and there will be ‘’laboratories’’ that is more a kind of rooms for different areas, for example: Body lab is just a room for dance, Bricolaje room is an open space with tables for make whatever thing (write, assemble things, use laptops, etc), TV room will have cameras, computers and televisions, a reading room, there will be a library, an auditorium and administrative offices, etc.

Teachers will be able to choose any course and assist to that class in some specific schedules. In the other hand there will be conferences in the auditorium.

I’m not sure if the building classified as a ’’Core Learning Space – Other Space’’ or as ‘’Public Assembly – Other Assembly’’. But mi question is if I consider the project as a ’’Core Learning Space – Other Space’’ do I have to use the LEED requirements for ‘’Schools’’?

Thank you very much

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Pushkala R Environmental Architect
Dec 05 2014
Guest
12 Thumbs Up

Choosing between LEED CS and EB for commercial building in India

Project Location: India

HI,
I am trying to apply for LEED certification as per LEED v3 2009 in India. My project profile is as follows:
1. It an existing building that has been in use for over a decade.

2. It underwent an HVAC retrofit 2 years back

3. The entire building is leased out to multiple tenants

Ideally, we would have to apply for LEED: Existing buildings O&M. But considering the entire building has been leased out to tenants, the owner does not have control over its O&M of the fitouts. Moreover, all the tenants have not connected to the new HVAC system. I wish to know if I can apply for LEED: Core and Shell under major renovations.

R Pushkala
India

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Srimannarayana NCVK ESD Consultant
Nov 13 2014
Guest
374 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

Hi,

We are working on a project in Dubai.
The building is 55% office and 45% hotel.
There is no floor level metering and the building has only one electricity meter.

I would like to know the challenges that we will be facing to acheive the required enegry star rating.
May i know your views please.

Thanks
Sriman

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Dec 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 600 Thumbs Up

Can you verify which rating system and version you are considering?

My suggestion is to start using ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager starting with an office facility and then entering a separate space type of hotel and see what happens assuming you can use Case 1.

Theoretically the office space type should be eligible for facilities that are at least 50% office. However, in practice this arrangement may not be intended for buildings where 45% of the facility is a hotel, and likely has a higher EUI than the office portion of the building.

If the results don't make sense, USGBC may be able to help you develop a Case 2 calculation.

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Emily Wang SCB
Nov 06 2014
Guest
12 Thumbs Up

Existing Dining Facility Building v3 rating system

Project Location: United States

I'm working on an existing Dining facility which has a significant amount of interior renovations and a small amount of NC, and exterior. The current building is not being used, nor being provided with any heating or cooling.

A large portion of the 20K area will be Food service preparation as well as the dining seating area. The industrial grade kitchen equipment being brought into the project requires a fair amount of exhaust and cooling. This is a concern I have. The other concern is bringing in future heating, cooling, and ventilation.

What is the best option for LEED pursuit if we are under v3?

EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.? CI? Any insight? Would we be exempt from calculation of load from the requiremenst for kitchen exhaust etc?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
Emily

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Dec 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 600 Thumbs Up

It sounds like the project would qualify as an NC project due to the extent of renovations and new construction, however it sounds like you are unsure if the project will meet the minimum energy prerequisite due to the intensity of the kitchen equipment? Your engineer may be able to offer some potential strategies to reach the minimum energy performance, even for a dining facility. CI may be a viable path as well depending on the magnitude of the envelope modifications and HVAC renovations not related to the "process" portion of the building, and knowing that it is discouraged for owner occupied buildings to use CI where there aren't any tenants. To investigate CI, the first step might be to run through the MPRs and Prerequisites to see how your project matches up. If you determine that neither NC or CI will work, you may consider other alternatives. Green Globes may be an option for you, since that rating system doesn't have prerequisites and might offer a better fit for this type of facility.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Nov 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
2814 Thumbs Up

Core and Shell for Residential project

Project Location: Spain

A developer certifies a 10 story residential building using the LEED Core and Shell rating system. He then sells the residential appartments to individual buyers, the building will no longer one entity. As such it would loose its C&S certification. Is that correct?

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Erica Downs Sustainability & LEED Consultant
Oct 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
2368 Thumbs Up

LEED: Homes eligibility?

Hello - We are starting major construction of our home, consisting of a gut-reno of the first floor; addition of a 2nd floor plus attic and porch; new mechanical systems, plumbing, electrical, windows, and doors; removal of all interior walls and ceilings; replacement of all siding and addition of insulation; and bringing the basement into the conditioned space and fixing water problems. Basically, it's a new house except for the foundation, and one partial exterior wall.

Do we qualify for LEED: Homes? It seems like we should, but in going through the flow chart tool on LEEDonline for selecting a certification program, it all comes down to how I answer the question, "Is the addition physically distinct from the rest of the building?" If I answer "yes", it says we qualify. If I answer "no" it says we do not. But I cannot find clarification of what this means.

Thanks! (Posted in LEED-H Forum as well.)

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Toni Herena Montull Project Engineer Aiguasol
Oct 15 2014
LEEDuser Member
73 Thumbs Up

CS 2009 or CS v4

Project Location: Spain

Hi,
this may be a silly question, but I do not know if there is any special requirement o detail that force me to start a project following CS v4 instead CS 2009. Is CS 2009 obsolete? I know it is recommended to start as soon as possible with CS v4, but is there a critical reason for it?

We have a client that thought in CS 2009 and we do not know if, when CS v4 is already working, if it is possible to start the registration with CS2009.

Thank you in advance and sunny regards.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Nov 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Toni, you can choose to use either Version 2009 or Version 4 until October 2016. Project registered after October 2016 MUST be Version 4, but for now you can choose either. There are arguments in favour of both versions, it mainly depends on the intentions and commitment of the owner.

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Joel Cesare Sustainable Building Advisor, City of Santa Monica Feb 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 12 Thumbs Up

Emmanuel, are there arguments for v2009 besides easier/less expensive?

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Feb 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Joel, I don´t think so. V4 makes a lot more sense to me and it puts LEED where it should be, challenging teams to make a project more efficient and sustainable. We are currently doing projects and without doing anything special we usually end up with LEED Silver. It all depends on the countries of couse, but in general in Europe and the US I would say that is the case.

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Erika Duran Sustainability Consultant Dagher Engineering
Sep 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
1327 Thumbs Up

How do I know if my project is in a LEED ND community

Project Location: United States

Is there are a resource out there that lets you know if your building is located in a LEED ND property? I tried GBIG but doesn't seem to have ND projects in their database.

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Timothy Schmitt Studio 222 Architects
Sep 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

NC 2009 or v4 Multifamily Midrise

Hi,
I'm working on a mid-rise residential development that includes residential units & parking. There are two adjoined buildings. Six floors above grade w/ one below (lower level & 1st Floor are primarily parking w/ residential units on Floors 2 thru 6). What are the advantages/disadvantages of going w/ either NC 2009 or v4 Multifamily Midrise? What would you recommend?

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Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Sep 12 2014 LEEDuser Expert 670 Thumbs Up

Hi Steve,

Great questions. Quick FYI - when looking at rating system selection, we don't count parking decks.

You have 3 options for this project: NC 2009, Midrise v4, or Midrise v2010.

USGBC recommends that all projects start using v4 as early as possible, since we've made quite a few improvements throughout the v4 rating systems. That being said, regardless of the version, we recommend Midrise over NC for this multifamily project because it's a more appropriate rating system. It was written specifically for this project type, whereas NC is more general since it is applicable across the gamut of commercial buildings.

As an architect, you will benefit from the onsite verification process required in Midrise. For example, all the energy efficiency specs/details that you develop will be verified to be installed properly on site by an energy expert. In addition, the onsite verification process means there is less documentation required, and nothing is required to be uploaded to LEED Online.

If you have any specific questions, I'd be happy to answer them.
-Asa

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator, Studio Domus Sep 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 705 Thumbs Up

Asa,

I have a very similar situation to Timothy's, except my project is located outside the US - in Guatemala. We've had a very difficult time with LEED for Homes in the past because it doesn't seem to be a very international-friendly rating system, so we would rather stick with NC or CS 2009.

My questions are:

1. How are the occupiable above-grade stories defined for LEED? Our project will have 4 occupiable stories, but the upper two will belong to the same apartment units (two-story apartments). I'm asking this because we are on the borderline of being allowed to use NC.

2. Could we use CS for a midrise residential building if the scope will not include a complete interior fit-out? Things such as furniture, lamps, and kitchen equipment will probably not be provided by the developer.

3. Given that the project is outside the US, do you agree that it would be better to use NC/CS than Midrise v4? What do you think our limitations would be?

Thanks for your help!

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Sep 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 2501 Thumbs Up

Alejandro,

Am afraid the GBCI did not agree to let me use LEED NC on a similar project I had in Khazakhstan. This scale of project is not appropriate for LEED CS--there are a few LEED CS residential projects but they have tend to be residential towers--almost all residential is either LEED for Homes, Midrise, or NC. Remember that we don't normally include furniture and lamps in any case for NC, you just need basic finishes and equipments like sanitary ware, AC, ventilation and basic ceiling/wall lighting. Regarding LEED for Homes: It was impossible for me to become certified as a LEED for Homes Reviewer, because you must track an existing project with a certified reviewer to complete your certification, something that I could not arrange to do outside the US. The requirements seem unnecessarily confusing. In my case we had to drop the project.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Nov 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Alejandro, Melissa, We are starting with the certification of a major renovation of a residential building that has 10 floors. First of all, since this project is in Spain, I think Midrise would not be an option because it would require someone from the USA to come over. I would love to become a Green Rater myself, but due to the lack of projects under the LEED for Homes rating system it may a bit too early for that. Did you go ahead with your project Alejandro? If so, what Rating system did you decide to apply? Melissa, I am surprised to hear GBCI did not let you use NC on a similar project. What was their argumentation? In our project I am evaluating NC agains CS. I am discussing with the developer, but it may be that they will offer the residential units without basic finishes such as interior finishes and water fixtures. Or to make it more complicated, they might offer some residential units including an interior fit-out and some residential units without such an interior fit-out. I am thinking of applying the 40/60 rule in that case. Interested in getting any feedback ...

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Pat Kirwan
Sep 10 2014
LEEDuser Member
10 Thumbs Up

Rating System ?

Hi All,

Looking for some advise on the selection of a rating system. We have an existing building which will undergo a major renovation (just the concrete shell will remain prior to renovation). Once complete it will be a Core and Shell development with one or multiple tenancies (Office Usage on all floors and a restaurant on Ground Floors). Which system is most appropriate, Core & Shell or Major Renovation (V4). Thanks in Advance.

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ACE Bermuda
Aug 26 2014
Guest
11 Thumbs Up

LEED Dynamic Plaque--any thoughts and experiences to share?

Hi all,
I'm curious to know if anyone has had experiences with installing and maintaining the Dynamic Plaque. Empirical opinions on the ease, or difficulty, of use would be appreciated. Even speculative thoughts on potential cost saving (in time, equipment, etc) of this budding scheme would be helpful in determining whether this is something our team should be pursuing. To provide an inkling of context, our building had achieved certification in 2011 under v2009, and we're quickly coming to the crossroads of choosing between Dynamic Plaque and recertification under v2009 EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. Apologies if this is the wrong place to post this message.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Sep 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5234 Thumbs Up

Ace, How timely. This discussion is the talk of the town at the moment. In its current format and of todays’ date the Dynamic Plaque (DP) is being touted by the LEED management as ‘continuous re-certification’. The DP will pull five parameters from a buildings operations namely: Energy usage, Water usage, a yearly transportation survey, a yearly recycle survey and a ’human’ experience survey. As you will well know LEED EB re-certification covers all aspects of the building operations including purchasing, mercury content, building cleanliness, green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices., pest management, etc, etc….so based on looking at the two formats the DP is a far simpler methodology to recertify a building than by the original LEED EB method. As to cost, it is suggested that the DP will be much cheaper as far less data gathering will be needed and there will be no content for the LEED EB AP to undertake and therefore no LEED EB AP fees. (The DP is to be sold direct by the USGBC to the building owner/operator and with major control companies currently able to supply BMS content direct to the plaque the only possible work that the LEED EB AP could perform is the yearly transportation survey and a recycle survey.) Currently we are told that the GBCI will be ‘certifying’ the DP data yearly with the option to gain increased points and increased LEED rating status. The DP will then enable buildings to raise their current Silver to Gold (as examples) based on an almost automatic process. Currently sold by the USGBC as a $300/month with a three year contract this methodology will be rolled out to the USGBC membership at Greenbuild in New Orleans.

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Xavier Valladares Sustainability Consultant ECOstudio XV LTD
Aug 18 2014
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or Healthcare for an Oupatient Building with 24h ER

We have a client that is questioning which LEED versión to use. The Building is an Outpatient Building with 20 consulting rooms, offices and a 24 hour Emergency Facility.
We already told them that Healtcare does not apply as there would be no "in patients" on the building. We also noted that despite having some "beds" in the Emergency facility, the patients should not stay more tan 8h, as they would need to be transfered to a proper Hospital if that was the case.
Can you confirm BD+C New Construction would apply to this building type?
Many thanks,
Regards,
XV

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Aug 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17092 Thumbs Up

I'm 99% sure that NC would be your LEED program. You could choose to use HC but it is not required (and I would not recommend it). Let's talk outpatients.

In the US, we define outpatients as those patients staying 23 hours or less (Same day stay). Note that this doesn't define hours of operation. You said that the Emergency Department is 24 hours which I've taken to mean that the building is open that length of time. As long as they wouldn't keep a patient over 23 hours, then it should be in NC. If they house patients over 23 hours and the building is outside the US, then you are in a gray area. I'd call the GBCI and get confirmation if this is the case.

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Aug 12 2014
LEEDuser Member
335 Thumbs Up

NC vs Core & Shell for Mixed Use Building

Working on a project that is:
151,971 SF - multi-family residential units (30%)
168,780 SF - retail/future occupant build out (33%)
185,870 SF - parking (37%)

In the past, we have used LEED NC for our mixed-use buildings. However the mixed-used buildings have never gone above 10% of the total area for future occupant build-out.

What are the advantages of using Core & Shell in this example?

I know for NC, any future tenant spaces need to be modeled as base line systems for the Energy Model. I fear that this will have drastic impacts on the project since 33% of it would not receive the benefits of energy efficient design.

Thanks

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Nicole Kimoto RIM Architects
Aug 06 2014
LEEDuser Member
699 Thumbs Up

LEED CI or NC?

We have an existing industrial / historical building, and the client is proposing to construct new office spaces on the interior, minimizing the impact as much as possible on the exterior shell of the building. Could we target for CI? or NC (major renovation?). Or would we consider EB as an option as well? I don't have a clue.

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Jay Murray LEED Administrator Commercial Construction Consulting
Aug 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
174 Thumbs Up

Which LEED Rating Category?

Our client asked me about a project he is working on. This is a 3,600 square foot cafeteria that is being added onto a 175,000 square foot existing factory. The owner expressed that he wants to have the addition be LEED certified. I was unclear under which rating system that this would fall? There is really nothing being done to the factory itself, the only construction being performed is adding this new cafeteria on. Thanks, Jay.

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Jan Hesse Dipl.-Ing.(FH) | LEED AP ID+C ALPHA Energy & Environment
Jun 20 2014
Guest
155 Thumbs Up

Unleased areas in New Construction

We are working on an office project were 80% of the area is leased to a single tenant and 20% is uleased yet. The project will be certified under New Construction after a request of the main tenant.
Now it is unclear how we should handle the unleased area in the certification. Especially in the IEQ category we are worried about some credits.
For example IEQc6.1: Controllability of Systems - Lighting:
All occupants in the leased area will have task lighting (about 80% of all FTEs). To receive the credit at least 50% of the FTEs in the unleased area need task lighting, too. After it is unleased, we can not show compliance yet. Is a tenant lease agreement necessary there or is there any other general approach?
Thank you for your help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Jan, these would be good questions to post to the specific LEEDuser forums on our site, such as IEQc6.1.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 1354 Thumbs Up

Jan - You probably also need to take a look at LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10102 which sets additional requirements for NC projects which have incomplete spaces (I assume that 20% would not be complete). This is based on the assumption that your project registered after it was posted in November 2011.

Based on that interpretation, I would anticipate that you would need to include the requirements of IQEc6.1 in your LI-required Tenant Guidelines and Owner Commitment Letter, but I wouldn't think you would need to include the future occupants in your credit calculations of IEQc6.1. From my reading, it looks like the future tenants/space only need to be included in the performance calculations of WEp1/WEc3 and the EAp2/EAc1.

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Juliane Muench
Jun 19 2014
LEEDuser Member
862 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or LEED schools

Hi! I have a 200.000 sf. university building with about 25 % of office space and 50% of learning space (open and closed spaces), the rest is circulation etc. I am a little insecure on which system to pick, NC or schools. It says that schools is mainly for K-12 schools, but it says, that it can also be used for higher education facilities.
What would you consider best?
Thanks,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Juliane, I think you could pick either system here. I personally think that LEED-NC is a better fit for a university building with mixed uses like this.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Jun 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
1355 Thumbs Up

LEED-EBOM for a shopping mall?

Does anyone have experience in getting a shopping mall LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certified? I am just wondering how feasible it would be considering a mall has many smaller multitenant spaces. Anything insight or experience is welcome, thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Courtney, I don't have experience on this, but I would acknowledge that anytime you have a lot of tenants, LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. can be more challenging. We have some helpful tips throughout this website on achieving certification in this case.

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Tom Kennedy Thomas E Kennedy, PE
May 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
155 Thumbs Up

One story condominium comlplex - tenant specification for LEED

Hello,
Myself and 3 others in the Cincinnati Regional Chapter did an intro to V4 event for chapter members tonight and fielded questions at the end.
A gentleman said he wants to generate a tenant design spec to all members of a condo association for an 18 unit single-story condo complex. Original construction was 1970's, so it is very due for upgrade. His impression is LEED Homes, when applied to renovation, pretty much forces going down to the "bones" and starting over. I recall hearing that Homes V4 was going to be more forgiving in this aspect. He wants to know what the best LEED approach might be. I don't believe V4 BD+C can fit due to single story residential nature. V4 has the "campus" and "group" approaches, might this be applicable here (since all condo residents will commit to a common specification)? Is it accurate that Homes V4 would be a better option than Homes V3? I do only commercial work, so I am not the right guy to field this questions - but I promised this gentleman I would ask and share what I found with the rest of the membership. Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Tom, it's true that LEED for Homes it not very well suited for minor renovations. I don't think that LEED for Homes v4 is much different than LEED 2009 on this. If the goal is to generate a tenant design spec than why does he have to worry about LEED rating system selection, though? The spec can be based on LEED strategies and not contingent on a specific scope of work or certification achievement.

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Eleftherios Zacharakis Environmental and Energy Consultant WSP Group Sweden
May 26 2014
LEEDuser Member
98 Thumbs Up

LEED-CS, CI or EBOM?

Hi, our client owns a building where there are two tenants, one occupying 75% and the other 25% of the total floor area. The tenant occupying the less area has been undergoing a renovation which the owner is doing and wishes for a LEED certification. However the renovation is almost finished and it might not be possible to achieve a high level or even certification. That sounds like a LEED-CI but it might be uncertain to achieve.

On the other hand, the owner has some experience with LEED-CS/NC and is intressted to start working with LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. and now is considering this rating system for this building. However the tenant occupying the largest floor area, 75%, do not wish to be involved to a possible certification.

Two questions:
1) Is it still possible to go for a LEED-EBOM certification without the involvement of both tenants?
2) Is it possible to go for a LEED-CS for the whole building accounting only the renovation of the tenant occupying the 25% of the building?

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BuildingWise LLC May 26 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5234 Thumbs Up

Eleftherios, your best bet is to certify with LEED EB.You don't need the tenants involvement (although there will be a few credits that won't be available to the team) but at least this would be certification for the whole building without having to manipulate for any spaces or timing issues.

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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
May 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
2501 Thumbs Up

CS but last minute changes indicate NC..... what to do?

We have been working for over 2 years on the design submittal of a very large LEED CS office tower, but the lease area has always been somewhat unclear and now, only a few weeks away from completing the Design Stage submittal, the owner won't confirm the area that will be let. The building is under construction now but is several years away from completion. There are internal reasons to submit as-is under CS . What is the worst-case scenario if we submit now, under CS, but showing a truthful estimation that the leasable space is more than 60% owner-occupied (including non-leasable space it will be closer to 90% owner controlled)? Will the reviewers refuse to review it as CS at all, and require us to switch to NC? Or will they let us carry on and require us to resolve everything at a later stage? Does anyone has experience of reviewers refusing because the project is under the wrong certification system? Does anyone have experience of switching systems after a successful design stage submittal?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Melissa, I haven't heard of a case where GBCI refused to review based on it being the wrong rating system, which isn't to say that it hasn't happened.

I would recommend contacting GBCI to get their take on the situation—just be honest and clear about what you need. I would not want to guess wrong on this and then have them go in a different direction.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia May 26 2014 LEEDuser Member 2501 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan, I do think thats the right thing to do as well. Its probably a formal enquiry question rather than a telephone call. I'll put their reply on this post when I hear back, for information purposes.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Jun 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 2501 Thumbs Up

I did receive a reply and it was definitive. They advised me to switch systems before submitting for Design Review (though no comment was offered on what would happen if we switched afterwards.) There was also no comment on what the exact protocol would be if we DID submit under the wrong system. The replier clarified that between NC and CS it is about the percentage of finished space under control of the owner, not the percentage of leased space; although I knew that, somehow having this emphasised did remove any trace of doubt (in our project the two areas would be quite different). They also said that IF the owner was scheduled to occupy a portion in the future, but that this was not fitted out at the time of the rest of the project, it would be considered unfinished space and therefore could be allocated to the non-owner portion of the building.

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Katrina Morgan Principal Fermata Consulting
May 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
103 Thumbs Up

Can 1 of 4 buildings on one site pursue LEED for Homes Midrise?

Proposing on a project that has four buildings. 3 buildings are 100% residential. 1 building is mixed-use with 25% retail + office, and 75% residential. The owner only wants to certify the mixed use building instead of all four buildings. The one building would be required to pursue LEED for Homes Midrise per the selection guidance.

My question is this: Can we only certify one building when the other three buildings are similar and also being built at the same time? My understanding is that would be considered false advertising because it makes it look like all the buildings are LEED for Homes, when only one is actually certified. But, I cannot find official language on this topic. Does anyone know where I might find guidance on this?

Thanks!

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC May 22 2014 LEEDuser Member 6509 Thumbs Up

Hi Katrina,
It is my understanding that you can always choose whether to certify one building or several in a multiple building scenario. If you are literally building them all concurrently under one contract, you would have to go to some effort to separate materials and waste issues. I have never heard a distinction made specifically for LEED for Homes Midrise with respect to this, though if your building is 5 stories or more you could consider LEED NC if you are going to use LEED 2009. Midrise is not mandatory for these buildings until v4. You might check the Multiple Buildings guidance. In a Master Site scenario, you are not obliged to certify everything even when it is within your campus boundary.

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Eunju Park
May 02 2014
Guest
71 Thumbs Up

Which tool should we use for LEED (NC? Homes?)

We are trying to achieve LEED for Resort club, but there is "back of house complex" of which facilities include admistration centre, central laundry, medical clinic, transport depot, maintenance depot, central security suveillance centre, central refuse faciliry and auxiliary police depot and "Els residence". Other places we are using NC, but is it required to use Home for the two places?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Eunju, is it a separate building, or all in one building? If it is all one building, you can stick with one rating system that is appropriate for most of the space. If there are multiple buildings the answer is more complicated.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Apr 30 2014
LEEDuser Member
220 Thumbs Up

Can a residential project be certified under LEED CS?

I would like to ask if a residential building of 4 or more storeys can be certified under LEED 2009 for Core and Shell system?
I read that residential buildings can be certified under LEED NC but I didn't find any information about using LEED CS.

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Apr 30 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Agata,

It depends on whether the Owner of the building will be occupying the space, as well as the scope of work for the project. If there are portions of the building fit out that will be under the scope of a future tenant and not the Owner, then a residential building could be a Core and Shell project. I have seen many residential buildings attempt Core and Shell with success. Just make sure the scope of work by the Owner versus the future tenants is clear throughout your application.

Hope this helps!

- Lauren

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 220 Thumbs Up

Lauren, All,
What if 100% fit-out is under the scope of future tenants? Is it still OK with the C&S?
The building is 100% residential and every single owner finishes own apartment. We are afraid we will not be able to fulfill all prerequisites, e.g. WE prerequisite 1 - list of plumbing fixtures, etc.
The building is more than 4 stories and the construction phase is going to begin in November. Maby we should use another system than C&S?

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Markus Henning M.Eng Facility Management LEED AP BD+C, Alpha Energy & Environment Aug 27 2014 Guest 234 Thumbs Up

Agata,

please refer to CS appendix 4 Tenant Lease or Sales Agreement i think that answer your question.

"However, if a developer makes technical requirements from the LEED for Core & Shell Rating System part of a binding lease or sales agreement, the project may be able to earn additional points for credits with technical requirements not addressed in the Core & Shell project design and construction scope. By encouraging green building practices in the tenant’s scope of work, Core & Shell projects with a limited scope can achieve credits for activities that would otherwise be beyond their design and construction control."

http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/LEED%202009%20CS%20Appendix%204...

Markus

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Ghaith Moufarege
Apr 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
8864 Thumbs Up

LEED for HealthCare 2009: International Projects

Hi All,
Does someone know if LEED for HealthCare 2009 is available for International Projects?
Thanks a lot,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 25 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Yes, it is.

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Ghaith Moufarege Apr 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 8864 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan. Is it mandatory for a hospital project, or we can choose to use LEED NC 2009?
Thanks

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Apr 29 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17092 Thumbs Up

If your project is an inpatient hospital, you need to use the HC standard. If your project is outpatient only, then you can choose. Most outpatient teams choose NC.

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Ghaith Moufarege May 02 2014 LEEDuser Member 8864 Thumbs Up

Thanks Susan.
I'm assuming that if a hospital has both inpatient and outpatient facilities, the "inpatient" category applies (more stringent) and I will be using LEED HC.

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Alan Viale SUMAC
Apr 24 2014
LEEDuser Member
131 Thumbs Up

LEED CI or LEED NC:MR

I present a case to confirm the selection of certification must have a project.

In a lot of 3900sqf there is a two-storey house with a total area of 4500sqf built on an area which over the years has changed from residential to commercial.

The owner has made ​​a lease for 10 years of the lot, with all the home built to a bank branch, because now the street has become commercial use.
The bank branch has developed an architectural proposal for modifications in the home without demolishing the lot at 100%, it is estimated that approximately 4840sqf culminate. This intervention has an extension on the second floor, and a reduction in area occupancy of the facade to give option to park users; also walls within the project will be demolished to make a distribution according to a bank branch. New specialties to the project (electrical, sanitary, air conditioning, mechanical, etc..) Will be proposed and currently not supply future needs.

Considering this should register the project for LEED-CI certification or LEED NC: MR?.

If more Scopes are required to resolve this consultation do not hesitate to submit it.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Alan, it seems like the scope of work is a major renovation and so I would go with LEED-NC.

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Mauricio Ramirez
Apr 23 2014
LEEDuser Member
691 Thumbs Up

LEED Schools mandatory for daycare?

Hello. I'm about to register a new project for Child Daycare facility. I read the LEED for Schools selection criteria that says that this is for schools of the K12 cycle, so pre-stages like pre-kindergarten are not required to certify on this Rating System. However I ask the forum if there is any update or addenda that i'm missing that requires LEED for Schools for Daycare facilities... Do you have any different approach? Thanks.

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Apr 24 2014 LEEDuser Member 1716 Thumbs Up

Helena (MT) Housing Authority's Early Learning and Job Training Center just earned LEED-Platinum. Designed to meet the needs of HUD's Headstart classrooms, the program also includes adult learning center, kitchen, restrooms and can be used for public assembly, just like any school. We used LEED-NC 2009 but "borrowed" several appropriate credits from LEED for Schools, i.e. acoustics, transportation, and some materials. This strategy obviously worked.

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Mauricio Ramirez Apr 24 2014 LEEDuser Member 691 Thumbs Up

Hi Kath, Thanks for taking the time to share your approach. Since the project name says "Early Learning", do you have pre-kindergarten children there? or is is just for teens and adults? Thanks!

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Kath Williams LEED Fellow 2011, Principal, Kath Williams + Associates Apr 24 2014 LEEDuser Member 1716 Thumbs Up

Totally pre-k during the day; adults in evening. No k-12 at all.

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alessandro speccher senior developer gbc italia
Apr 18 2014
LEEDuser Member
79 Thumbs Up

LEED CS with partially occupied building

hello everybody,
this is my first post on leeduser and I want to start giving compliments to everybody are sharing so lot of knoweledge;
returning to building, a design team described me this context:
- 10 floor building with 4 of them occupied by tenant and 6 of them free.
the owner wants to:
- renovate the envelope
- install new hvac
- renovate the 6 floor that are not occupied (no tenant fit out)
- add 2 more floors
- do all of this work without moving out the 4 tenants

note that is not possible to use leed EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. because the 4 tenant that occupy the 4 floors are not interested.

Do you see any conflicts in using leed CS ?

thank you very much and happy easter !

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Nov 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Alessandro,
It seems to me that the scope of renovation is quite large for an O+M certification. On the other hand, you do not need collaboration of all tenants to do O+M. I would consider this a CS scope.

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Anna Lehr
Apr 14 2014
Guest
106 Thumbs Up

Anticipated Type?

Hello,

I am registering a project at the USGBC website, and would like to get input regarding the best categorization of our building "type." We have appx. 5,822 SF of commercial/restaurant space, 6,042 SF of hotel space, and 6,806 SF of apartment/residential space.

Thanks for your input!

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Eamon Geary Sustainability Director - Facilities, Michael Baker Jr, Inc. Aug 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 749 Thumbs Up

Did you ever get a response to this question? The reason I ask is we too have a similar project.

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Rosana Correa Director Casa do Futuro
Apr 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
532 Thumbs Up

Two Contractors at the same time (LEED NC or C&S)

Commercial C&S building. The owner found a tenant and will allow the contractor hired by this tenant to carry out the work in private areas before the contractor hired for core&shell scope delivers its job .
Two contractors will be working at the building at the same time and only the one responsible for Core & Sheel scope (hired by the owner) will follow LEED premisses. The tenant is not interested in following the goals of certification and thus we can not pursue LEED NC.
Can we still go for LEED C&S?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Apr 09 2014 LEEDuser Expert 18918 Thumbs Up

You should be fine - the tenants in a CS project aren't required to pursue LEED. See MPR Supplemental Guidance (Rev #2) pg 22: "For a project certifying under LEED-CS, the project is considered a ‘building in its entirety’ without interior fit-outs being complete."

Having separate contractors makes the documentation a bit easier, since materials for the CS work will be purchased and tracked by the CS contractor and does not include any of the TI work.

One warning: for MRc3, the construction waste for the C&S project should be tracked separately from the Tenant Improvement (TI) waste. Ideally, this would be separate waste bins for the CS work and the TI work. Since that may be unrealistic, you’ll need to work with each contractor and the waste hauler and decide how to prorate the waste in each bin and in each monthly report from the hauler. You’ll need to show what % of each waste report is attributed to the CS work, and what % is for the TI work. It may help to take a photograph of the bin (looking down on the contents) so you can verify if a load contains scrap metal , drywall, wood, etc.

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Rosana Correa Director, Casa do Futuro Apr 14 2014 LEEDuser Member 532 Thumbs Up

Thank you David!

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Rick Alfandre Principal Alfandre Architecture
Apr 09 2014
LEEDuser Member
509 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM current rating system...

What is the current operating LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. sytem? For a commercial office space, do we need to pursue LEED EBOM 2009 or LEED EBOM v4?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 09 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

RIck, there is currently a phase-in period—until June 2015—where you can choose either LEED v4 or LEED 2009.

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Rehan Siddiqui Jun 24 2014 Guest 32 Thumbs Up

You mean 2014

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 24 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

I do mean 2015. Currently you can register for either LEED 2009 or LEED v4. About a year from now LEED 2009 registration will close.

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Rehan Siddiqui Jun 25 2014 Guest 32 Thumbs Up

Oh I see, I confused it with taking the LEED exam... Thanks

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator Studio Domus
Apr 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
705 Thumbs Up

LEED for Homes v4: International Projects

Hi,

Could someone please clarify what the current situation is with the LEED for Homes rating system for international projects, under LEED v4? Is there no longer a minimum number of homes required? Must the Green Rater Training be done in the US?

Assuming I could become a Green Rater in Guatemala, could I work with a Homes Provider QAD in the US, or is the Provider required to be based in the country where the project is located?

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Alejandro,
I have been investigating the same issue but it is not clear to me either. So I hope someone will clarify this issue.

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Alejandro Rivera Rivera Sustainability Coordinator, Studio Domus Apr 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 705 Thumbs Up

Also, if someone knows of a Green Rater and Provider who have experience working on projects abroad, please send them my way! I would like to get a quote for a house of approximately 8,500 square feet, located in Guatemala.

Thanks!

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Ghaith Moufarege Apr 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 8864 Thumbs Up

Alejandro, you can find a list on the USGBC's website
www.usgbc.org/people/green-raters

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KOMAL B Apr 11 2014 Guest 87 Thumbs Up

hi,
Even we want to know how it works for international projects? Is it necessary that the LEED service providers has to be from the same country.
Any help regarding this query will be appreciated.

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Samuel Nation PE, LEED AP B D + C DVPE
Apr 03 2014
Guest
154 Thumbs Up

LEED-NC or LEED-CI

We are renovating a large portion of a bldg on a University campus but there is a significant area of the building we are not touching at all. It was renovated a couple of years ago. Can we get certified in NC for only the area we are working in or do we need to use CI?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 03 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Samuel, some rough square footage numbers would help to answer your question. You should also look at the rating system guidance document referenced above, and MPR3.

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Samuel Nation PE, LEED AP B D + C, DVPE Apr 03 2014 Guest 154 Thumbs Up

I think I know the answer but...
Roughly: gross 130K sq. ft.
renovation: 60K sq. ft

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Samuel, you could definitely not use NC for the renovation, since NC is a whole-building rating system and you are talking about just a fraction of the building. Whether you can use CI for the renovation, or whether you need to apply NC to the entire building, depends on reading the guidance document and MPR3, which I've already referred you to.

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Mario S.
Apr 03 2014
LEEDuser Member
582 Thumbs Up

3 floors + Attic: LEED Homes or LEED NC?

Good day,

I have a residential development project outside the U.S which consists of several low-rise buildings of 3 stories + Attic (3rd floor hence consists of a duplex). The attic, being the 4th floor, doesn't have a separate entrance however and hence could not be considered as a separate floor.
In that case, would this development be considered suitable for LEED Homes or LEED NC?

Your prompt feedback is highly appreciated

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Apr 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Mario, where do you get the definition of "floor" from? Is there some definition that states that a floor needs a separate entrace? Are all floors residential? My guess would be that, in case the attic has a serious height, it would qualify as a habitable space and the floor on which you have habitable space could be considered a floor. That would mean LEED NC . But would be good to get confirmation from some other professionals with experience in residential development.

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Mario S. Apr 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 582 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your reply Emmanuel.
Well, the Attic is below a pitched roof that has a steep slope of 34 deg, a maximum height of around 2.9 m at the middle and takes around half of the 3rd floor roof areaRoof area is the area of the uppermost surface of the building which covers enclosed Gross Floor Area, as measured when projected onto a flat, horizontal surface (i.e. as seen in Roof Plan view). ‘Roofs’, or portions of roofs, covering unenclosed areas (e.g. roofs over porches and open covered parking structures) are not included in the areas used to evaluate compliance with SSc7.2, though they may be applicable to SSc7.1..
My own assumption is that a floor is a separate apartment, but i might be wrong about that!

The bottom line is: can this attic qualify as a "habitable story" and thus end up with a "4 habitable stories" building suitable for LEED NC?

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Javier Garcia Jones Valladares Ingenieria Apr 03 2014 Guest 178 Thumbs Up

Hi Mario,

Remenber that if you are going to use ASHRAE 90.1 stories under grade are not considered as story

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Apr 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Mario, I do not think Mario´s project has any under grade stories. I think the attic could be considered a 4th floor but it would be nice if someone could confirm that.

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Mario S. Apr 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 582 Thumbs Up

True, the buildings dont include any under grade stories.
And to be more specific concerning the roof, it's a hipped roof not a gable one!
Has anyone dealt with such a case before?

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Mario S. Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 582 Thumbs Up

Seems this case is not quite common, is it?!
Can anyone please advise on Emmanuel's guess?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Mario, it sounds like you are splitting hairs. From your description, the "attic" is a fourth floor that is habitable.

If you are trying to exclude it just to qualify for a different LEED rating system, I would keep in mind that USGBC/GBCI are generally a bit flexible about choice of rating system. I would contact them for advice on what you should use.

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Mario S. Apr 09 2014 LEEDuser Member 582 Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply Tristan!
I'm not trying to exclude anything, Im just exposing the case as is with as much details as possible!
Personally, i would find LEED for Homes to be more logical in this particular case, however im seeking other professional advice such as yours for confirmation.
In all cases, i have contacted USGBC and am awaiting their reply now.

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Ebenezer Natoplag
Apr 01 2014
Guest
71 Thumbs Up

BOD

Can somebody give me a copy of LEEDuser
(BOD Document) - Basis of Design

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 02 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Ebnezer, that document is available to LEEDuser members through the Documentation Toolkit under EAp1: Fundamental Commissioning.

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Ran Zhang
Apr 01 2014
LEEDuser Member
236 Thumbs Up

LEED Options

A client of mine just bought a partial complete building, which is bascally a shell of concrete structure but intended to be a commercial office building for leasing after full completion. He wants to do something good and LEED is one of the first things that came to his mind. I told him it's too late to apply for LEED CS as it's already in late construction stage but he may consider doing LEED CI for two of the 20 floors he is going to occupany (the rest 18 will be for leasing). His question is if it's possible to do LEED CI for the common areas, basically lobbies, corrirors, and toilets. I told him I'm not aware of any precedent but will check and get back to him.

Is it possible to apply for LEED CI for two floors + all common areas of the building, or LEED CI for just all common areas of the building.

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Ran, it seems an unlikely scenario to me. I think it would confuse the intent of a CI certification to extend throughout the building. Check the guidance document posted above, and MPR3.

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Usama Eita
Mar 31 2014
LEEDuser Member
435 Thumbs Up

LEED bledge

Dear all,
we got LEED Gold certification for PNU-Acdemic campus ...
so, How long it will take for the Gold pledge to be delivered to the PNU site ?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Usama, I guess you mean the plaque?

You have to order it through green plaque dot com, and they would be able to tell you the delivery timing.

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Cassandra Coffin
Mar 25 2014
LEEDuser Member
218 Thumbs Up

LEED Rating System for Food Service Renovation in Dormitory

What LEED rating system would I use for a food service renovation in an existing dormitory? The building was built in 1927 and has had 6 renovations, the last of which was in 1984. The client would like to achieve Gold certification.

Thanks!

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Mar 31 2014 LEEDuser Expert 18918 Thumbs Up

Sounds like it would probably be Commercial Interiors (CI) since it only part of a building, but it’s fairly extensive for just that space. Check the Rating System Selection Guidance at
http://www.usgbc.org/resources/rating-system-selection-guidance

Or, you can also start to register the project in LEED online and when it asks if you need help choosing a rating system click through the questions and click all the links to consult the tables that break out the work scope, systems affected, etc.

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Ann Palermo
Mar 11 2014
Guest
314 Thumbs Up

Multiple buildings, common basement

Hi,
We have a BPO project that wants to be certified but the case is that it shares a common basement with a retail and a hotel. Can it be applied under LEED for Core and Shell (BPO only) since the retail and the Hotel is still not entertaining the idea of LEED certification?

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Patrick Lee
Mar 02 2014
Guest
79 Thumbs Up

Mix Use Development

I am working on a project with equal floor space distribution of apartments, hotel and offices.
It will consist of 2 towers and shared underground carparking facility.
The owner will lease the hotel to an operator, lease the office space and sell the apartments to home owners.
What would be a the suitable rating system? NC - C&S?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Patrick, it sounds to me like LEED-NC given how much of the space will be completely fit-out.

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Usama Eita
Feb 28 2014
LEEDuser Member
435 Thumbs Up

rating system selection

Dear LEED users
I would like to use the 40/60 rule to select suitable rating system between NC 2009 and Healthcare NC2009 for a Hospital building project including the facilities inside (e.g administration- laundry room- accounting department,HR offices.. etc) , but i do not know how to calculate the percent of this rule. could someone help me? Thanks

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Feb 28 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17092 Thumbs Up

Usama - It sounds like you are doing a renovation project. Have you considered CI? From what I understand on HC, you are either in or you are out. I'm not sure if the GBCI will allow an NC project in a hospital. You're best off calling.

Susan

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Usama Eita Feb 28 2014 LEEDuser Member 435 Thumbs Up

Susan, thanks for your reply, Our project will start after few days, It will be a hospital and i would like to choose a suitable rating system that will be NC 2009 or HC-NC2009 and i need to decide through using 40/60 rule to determine the percent. thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 28 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Usama, if if it is a HC facility it sounds like you need to use LEED-HC. If you are trying to apply the 40/60 rule, that is based on floor area, so what is the floor area of the various spaces? But as Susan said, I think it's a Healthcare project, unless it's an interior renovation, in which case perhaps LEED-CI.

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Mar 04 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17092 Thumbs Up

If you are in a hospital, then you likely need to use HC. Your choices in programs are HC or CI. To determine CI, you need to have a better understanding of the building the project is in and the overall campus.

For example, we have a project that is a major renovation of an inpatient bed tower. The overall continguous, I-2 Hospital is right around 2 million square feet. The project's building is 240,000 s.f. or a little more than 10%. The amount of that building under renovation is 80% of the total building. We approached the GBCI and they offered us CI as a program but we're completely upgrading mechanical, plumbing, windows, roof and improving the building envelope. They agreed to use the HC protocol. Hospital renovations are tricky and you need to do the analysis between programs.

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Ghaith Moufarege
Feb 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
8864 Thumbs Up

Dormitories - LEED NC?

Hi All,
This international project consists of several 3 stories dormitories. These are close to a university campus but independent.
The rooms have kitchenette with microwave and small fridge but no cooking area. Communal areas comprise kitchens with cooking area, lounge, reception and laundry.
The below is an extract of the Rating System Selection Guidance
"For buildings such as dormitories and assisted living facilities that have common areas (central kitchens and lounges) it is at the project team’s discretion to define the common areas and the living units as residential"

Therefore I believe that we can consider the project as non-residential and apply for LEED NC. Am I choosing the right rating system ?
Note that LEED for Homes is not yet available for international projects, and therefore is not an option.
Thanks a lot

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Mika Kania LEED Associate, USGBC Feb 18 2014 Guest 302 Thumbs Up

Hi Omar,
LEED for Homes is now available to international projects and can register on the same site as those in the U.S.: https://www.usgbc.org/leedonline.new/
Best,

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Ghaith Moufarege Feb 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 8864 Thumbs Up

Thanks Mika, interesting news for international projects, but we can still choose to go for LEED NC for such dormitories project, right?
This is because rooms do not have a proper cooking area: Then we could consider them as non-residential as per the Rating System Selection Guidance.
Best,

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Mika Kania LEED Associate, USGBC Feb 24 2014 Guest 302 Thumbs Up

Yes, that is correct you can use either.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Mar 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 2501 Thumbs Up

The restrictions for LEED for Homes for international projects are important to note--first of all the number of units that is required, secondly there is a scarcity of licensed Homes certifiers globally. We wanted to certify a project in Khazakstan, the number of units was OK but we found that going through the process to become a licensed homes certifier was virtually impossible unless living in the US--training cannot be done in a few months-- and therefore we couldn't dedicate a member of our team to this mission; rather a certifier would have to be flown in from the US for the inspections, imposing an unreasonable added cost, so the LEED certification was dropped. LEED NC is far, far easier for international projects currently.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Mar 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Melissa,
What you are writing is very interesting. I was under the impression that there is no longer a minimum number of homes required for international LEED for Homes projects. I am thinking of starting the Green Home Rater training in order to be able to certify future international projects. You seem to be saying that is not an easy process.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Mar 12 2014 LEEDuser Member 2501 Thumbs Up

Emmanuel

Its possible they've already dropped the minimum, that must be quite recent, but it doesn't change the Green Home Rater situation--I might not have received the best support at the time, but I was quite keen to do the training last autumn --I am half the time in NYC. My impression is that its difficult to find a training course--I could only find one in Pittsburgh over one weekend during the entire month I was here, and furthermore it is very difficult to complete the training since it requires following a real project under the supervision of a qualified Green Homes Rater. That's just not possible for someone overseas except under exceptional circumstances. So I didn't bother to take the course since there was no way to qualify in time for the project in question and chances of a repeat project request were slim. I could be wrong; I found it most peculiar that the system could be that limiting. I'd welcome any challenging opinions.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Mar 13 2014 LEEDuser Member 2814 Thumbs Up

Melissa,
I understand your frustration. I still think it would be a good thing to try to become a Green Homes Rater and will look into possibilities of maybe online training in combination to some visits to the US to follow up a project. Will keep you posted if you would like that.

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ADRIENN GELESZ LEED AP, ABUD Engineering Ltd. Mar 14 2014 Guest 1585 Thumbs Up

In a recent newsletter of USGBC I read that there are now green raters in Turkey as well: http://www.usgbc.org/articles/meet-international-green-raters-emre-and-b...
Maybe some other countries have now also some experts.

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Javier Garcia Jones Valladares Ingenieria
Feb 11 2014
Guest
178 Thumbs Up

LEED CS VS LEED NC

Hi,

I'm working in major renovation on an office project that is going to be lease out once it's finnished.
Project scope includes initial tenant fit out (HVAC, lignting, ceilings,etc).
Which rating system should I use?.

Best Regards

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Mar 07 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Javier, I'm not clear from your post how much tenant fit-out you're doing. How finished will the spaces be?

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Marcio Alberto Casado Pereira
Feb 10 2014
Guest
4196 Thumbs Up

Brand new building - LEED EB?

Is there a minimum "age" that the building needs to have in order to be elegible to pursue LEED EBO&M?

Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 10 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Marcio, the limiting factor is that you need 12 months of energy performance data. (You need other performance data as well, but less than 12 months' worth in other cases.)

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Marcio Alberto Casado Pereira Feb 10 2014 Guest 4196 Thumbs Up

Got it. Thanks Tristan!

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Feb 10 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5234 Thumbs Up

Marcio

Tristan's quite right...the only problem with the 12 months of energy bills is that in any brand new building the opening 1 or 2 months energy can be 'all over the place' and it may take a quarter to settle down. As Energy Star uses a rolling 12 months those opening months, if a reflection of the building settling down, can throw the Energy Star off...and of course you'll need to wait a few months before the numbers you are uploading in Energy Star actually do reflect the real Energy Star of the building.

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Juan David Pres. CEO JCD ARCHITECT, INC
Feb 04 2014
Guest
287 Thumbs Up

BLDG UNDER CONSTRUCTION

How do I classify a Building already under construction; all Site Utilities in place, 1st Fl. slab in place and 1st Fl Ext. walls already up, in other words a 1st. Fl. Shell is in place.
Can I do it under NC?, or then my only alternative is EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.? If so; I do I rate it if it's under construction, therefore no Performance, or Occupants yet!
Need some guidance here!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 04 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Juan, theoretically you could still pursue LEED-NC, but depending on the process you've followed you may have trouble documenting or meeting certain requirements (Fundamental Commissioning is a key prerequisite that would be of concern here).

You can do EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., but you'll need 12 months of performance, so while you can start on your LEED strategies now, you'll some patience before you get your certification.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner ArchEcology, LLC
Feb 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
6509 Thumbs Up

New Midrise Rating Selection Guidance

Has anyone seen the newest release of the Rating System Selection Guidance (dated 1/27/14 on the download page no date on the document)?
It indicates that multifamily residential buildings of 4 to 8 stories that are more than 50% residential now MUST follow LEED for Homes Multifamily Midrise.

This has been a big bone of contention in the past. Buildings whether residential or not that are over 5 stories in our region use commercial construction methodologies and the commercial energy code. We have several multifamily homes developers who have tried both systems and find Homes to be more prescriptive and therefore more costly. They prefer NC.

Up until now, a project could pursue a preferred rating system if it could meet the MPRs and the prerequisites and achieve certification. This no longer appears to be the case. The guidance was misinterpreted by some of my staff because the word "Homes" is not a part of the title of the rating system. They did not pick up on the significance of the shift until they realized the link to the Multifamily Midrise resources leads you to the Homes page.

As we all know, this means that many of us consultants that work on these projects will not be able to do so in the future to any great extent, because of the Homes Provider structure. Though Homes Providers are precluded from giving the kind of design guidance that we can as LEED consultants, the scope for that kind of guidance in such a prescriptive system is relatively small, excepting the energy model.

Further I see no indication that there is any current effort to create more Homes Providers in conjunction with this change. There's lots of info about becoming raters, but nothing I could find about Homes Providers. I even saw a suggestion in a general online search that to become a Homes Provider you should contact the local Homes Provider for info.

Clearly it would suit GBCI to reduce the review times for these projects by handing off much of the accountability to the Homes Provider. And there is obviously some confusion among the inexperienced with LEED about which rating system to use. However, there is a lot more at stake than streamlining their operation.

We've been LEED APs for more than 10 years and green building consultants for more than 7 years. We've done work in every rating system of LEED, excepting of course Homes, and in Green Globes, Green Communities and Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard. From our perspective, the more prescriptive the system the less room our clients have to pursue the kind of tradeoffs that lead to innovation and cost effective implementation of their sustainable goals.

Given some of the other programs GBCI is launching to deal with reducing review times that also impact these projects, we do not believe this policy change is necessary or beneficial. Do you?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 04 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Thanks for your post, Michelle. I completely agree with you and I don't see an immediate benefit to the policy change. How sneaky of the USGBC to release new rating system selection guidance just last week! I think it is very frustrating for project teams who are currently working with multifamily residential buildings that are within the one to five-story range with this new guidance, as I do not believe the certification process for Homes and Multifamily Lowrise, let alone Multifamily MIdrise, is ready to support current projects on the board seeking certification. Regardless, there is always the 40/60 rule that project teams and their clients can fall back on - the rules are not always as set-in-stone as one would think... like we've both said, so long as your project meets the minimum requirements and can achieve the prerequisites, then most times certifying under the rating system of your choice is possible. Does it mean your project may not be eligible for certain credits? Absolutely, but such is the case for every project depending on scope, location, and design.

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Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Feb 05 2014 LEEDuser Expert 670 Thumbs Up

Hi, I'd like to clarify a few items. Thanks for bringing up the rating system selection for multifamily buildings, since quite a few things aren't totally clear at this point.

First off, the rating system selection guidance has not changed for v2009 projects. 4-8 story buildings are required to do Midrise if they are pursuing LEED v4. Because v4 isn't required for well over a year, there is plenty of time for the market to prepare for this change. The rating system selection can also be found in the User Guide, which was posted in October 2013, found here: http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/LEED%20v4%20User%20Guide_Final_...

It states that multi-family residential buildings of 4 to 8 occupiable stories above grade must use Midrise, if the building has 50% or more residential
space. Buildings near 8 stories can inquire with USGBC about using Midrise or New Construction, if appropriate.

For example, if there is a large development that is predominantly using New Construction , if they have a 7 story residential building, we would allow them to use New Construction because that would allow them to use a single rating system for the entire project. Alternatively, if there is a development of predominantly 4 to 6 story multifamily buildings, we would allow them to use Midrise on an 11 story tower.

We have actually been getting a lot of pressure from developers to use Midrise for buildings taller than 8 stories. We’ve granted allowances for multiple projects that have buildings in the teens of stories to use Midrise. They find that Midrise is a more appropriate rating system, since it was tailor made for large multifamily projects.

We are constantly evaluating how each rating system is administered in order to provide maximum value. Currently, the LEED for Homes delivery model, consisting of Green Raters and Provider QAD organizations, is very effective at providing high quality services to the market. We are focusing all of our delivery-related communications around the fact that projects must contract with a Green Rater. Anyone with proper qualifications can become a Green Rater and provide LEED for Homes services.

Green Raters are required to work with a Provider QAD, who is responsible for QA’ing the project submittal before it gets sent to GBCI. A LEED for Homes project does not need to have a contractual relationship with the Provider, the relationship is between the project and the Green Rater. For this reason, we want to expand the Green Rater pool, so I would encourage any service provider interested in working with the LEED for Homes program to look into becoming a Green Rater. Find out more on how to become a Green Rater here: http://www.usgbc.org/leed/credentials/certificates/green-raters

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Asa,

Thank you so much for all of the information and for replying to this inquiry. Would it make more sense to update the Rating System Selection Tool to more clearly indicate that the update pertains to v4 projects? Right now, I am not sure how someone would make the distinction as to whether whether they should follow the guidance in this document: http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/RatingSystemSelection_01222013.pdf versus this document: http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs10134.pdf The guidance in both documents is nearly the same, though the June 2011 version of the document does not include all of the rating systems that will be available under v4.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Feb 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 6509 Thumbs Up

Hi Asa,
Thanks for the response. Always good to get information from the horses mouth. I appreciate the change only applies to v4, but it's worth noting that it is a policy change. Saying you "must" use a particular rating system vs. you can choose which rating system you would prefer based on your ability to comply, that's a significant change of years of past LEED system sensibility.

Ironically, that speaks to your statement about getting pressure on buildings over 8 stories. The guidance there says you "must" use NC rather than you can choose. Allowances wouldn't be needed without the must.

I also appreciate the flexibility you refer to with respect to multi-building tract development, though our urban projects tend to be singular midrise and high rise buildings. I do not dispute the Homes model provides quality. However, I have lingering concerns about tradeoffs and the extent to which the quality is accomplished by the prescriptive nature of the program and constrains opportunities to innovate vs. the field verification. Perhaps that is just my lack of experience with Homes projects.

Your perspective on the Homes Provider vs. the Green Rater is invaluable. I have obviously misunderstood the Provider role to a significant degree if it is only QA in your view. I have been under the impression that they are the focal point of communication to GBCI and define many of the parameters of project compliance upfront. That they register the project. That they are the required participant in the Integrated Project Planning rather than the Rater, etc. But when the Provider is also the Rater, perhaps those lines can blur.

You've given me some food for thought. And the motivation to delve deeper into the Provider/Rater relationship. Thanks.

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Beth Nelson
Feb 03 2014
Guest
332 Thumbs Up

LEED-CS vs LEED for Homes

Please advise whether you think LEED-CS is the appropriate rating system
for the project, giving the following:
- The project involves converting an existing 2-story warehouse
into condos. We're renovating the core and shell, and fitting out only
the elevator lobbies and 1 model unit.
- The other condos will be built as they are sold. So, we do
not have control of the design of those units.
- Less than 40% of the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) will have finishes or
MEP.
- So, the building has only 2 stories, both above grade. There
will also been an occupied roof garden (without walls).

It sounds like it would be eligible for LEED-CS, except for the fact that it's under 2 stories.

Or, would it fit into LEED for Homes? And if so, can a LEED Accredited Architect register the project, or does it have to be a Green Rater?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Beth,

CS sounds like your best bet.

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Beth Nelson Feb 03 2014 Guest 332 Thumbs Up

Coincidentally, right after I posted this, I got this email from USGBC:

" If the building you wish to certify is 60% or more residential (including the spaces that support the residential use such as common corridors, main lobby, etc.) and it is NOT a dorm or assisted living facility, then this project is eligible for neither NC nor CS. It would be a low-rise residential building, which per the RSS Guidance are only eligible for LEED-Homes (see Residential Applications Table pop-up at bottom of this page: http://www.usgbc.org/leed/certification/guidance/space-usage-type).

"However, in Homes only 'gut-renovations' (down to the studs, or other structure such that insulation can be inspected, etc) are eligible to certify (see http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-homes-v2008-scope-and-eligibility-gu...).

"It appears that this project may not be eligible for any LEED rating system, unless you want to go for EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. after the work is done and you have at least a year of typical physical occupancy that meets MPR 5's requirements for EBOM. "

Why wouldn't it be eligible? I don't see how the height of the building would impact the eligibility?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

First, there is a likelihood that the person at the USGBC who answered your question may not know as much as you would like about the certification process and/or what qualifies you for which rating system, etc. They have a lot of people who plug in answers without reading your inquiry in-depth. Second, I have seen project types similar to yours go through certification. According to USGBC, as long as you meet the MPRs, you can pretty much choose whichever rating system you feel best suits your project when it comes to NC vs CS. Very rarely have I seen them kick back a project that has submitted under one rating system versus the other. The only thing I have ever seen them do is require a Schools project that submitted under NC to provide documentation demonstrating that the project meets the Schools prerequisites that differ from NC. Does Home apply to you? Yes. Can you not consider CS? I don't think the answer you received is accurate based on my experience... I also disagree that EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. is your only option or that you possibly do not qualify for for LEED at all. In my opinion, I would request a conference call with someone at USGBC. Maybe you can get specifics behind why they feel their answer to your question is justified. If you do, please do share your discussion here. Best of luck!

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Beth Nelson Feb 03 2014 Guest 332 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your feedback, Lauren! I'll see if I can get a conference call with USGBC.

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Beth Nelson Feb 18 2014 Guest 332 Thumbs Up

We are most likely going to pursue LEED for Homes, working with a Green Rater.
We're going to register each of the units -- the model one as well as the future units -- as individual projects.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc.
Jan 20 2014
LEEDuser Member
535 Thumbs Up

CS vs NC

The project is a new, ground-up, manufacturing/warehouse/office building, and due to heavy process loads, it does not seem to meet LEED NC EA p2, and the owner will not purchase any new equipment to make the process more efficient. The owner and tenant are the same entity. Are we permitted to apply for LEED CS instead and leave out the build-out and process portion all together?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Feb 03 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Joann,

Sounds like an issue. I don't think you would qualify for CS, and NC sounds like your only option at this point.

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Taygun Yüksel CONSULTANT SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND OPERATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING
Jan 17 2014
Guest
180 Thumbs Up

which one that we should select?

Hi,
I'm working on a consultancy office in Turkey. And we have a a hospital project that it will be only constructed from the firm then sell it to tenant later. It's sort of core and shell hospital project, we are confused what type of LEED project is suitable.

Thank you in advance,

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 20 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17092 Thumbs Up

Can you give us a little more detail? Are you building operating rooms and then turning the building over to the tenant? Is the building mostly doctor's offices with minor procedures? How far are you taking the core and shell portion? You could be in LEED CS, LEED NC or LEED HC.

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Taygun Yüksel CONSULTANT, SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS AND OPERATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING Jan 22 2014 Guest 180 Thumbs Up

Actually we misunderstood project progress. It is already determined as V4 Hospital project, thanks for reply Susan.
Best regards

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Jan 22 2014 LEEDuser Expert 17092 Thumbs Up

That is interesting. I hope you join us over on the healthcare board even though we primarily discuss HCv3. I'm not aware of a thread discussing HCv4.

Susan

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Katherine Sheesley
Jan 10 2014
Guest
87 Thumbs Up

LEED Rating System - which one?

Academic building of 75,000 SF on 3 floors with multipurpose class labs, faculty office and classrooms on a community college campus.

Should the LEED v4 NC or LEED v4 Schools rating system be used?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Jan 10 2014 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Katherine,

Is this a university? Note that the Schools rating system applies to K-12 projects. Hopefully that gives you your answer.

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Patricia Lloyd LEED Project Coordinator Leopardo Companies, Inc.
Jan 08 2014
LEEDuser Member
198 Thumbs Up

High Rise Condo's

Would a high rise condo building (greater than ten floors) be considered LEED for Homes or LEED NC? I think they are thinking LEED NC, but wasn't sure if that could apply.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Patricia, there is a great table in the LEED rating system selection guidance (see link above) that will walk you through this. Most likely it's going to be LEED-NC, but there is some leeway for Homes Mid-Rise.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc. Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 535 Thumbs Up

Per USGBC Rating Systems definition,
"...New construction also includes high-rise residential buildings 9 stories or more."

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc.
Jan 07 2014
LEEDuser Member
535 Thumbs Up

NC or CI?

The project is a new construction consisting of a heavy process manufacturing plant and a corporate office wing. It turns out the plant wouldn't meet EAp2, no matter how efficient HVAC system we put in due to large process load. Therefore, we decided to pursue LEED certification for the office portion only. Can it be done as LEED NC or the only option is LEED CI? The office is directly connected to the plant.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc. Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 535 Thumbs Up

I would appreciate it if anyone has any insight to my question. Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Joann, please see our FAQs about response time on our forums.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Expert 5234 Thumbs Up

Joann, With this limited information the basic answer is that you can divide the building into two sections provided that you don't gerrymander the spaces. An example can be your factory with office wing. Standing at the front of the building would it be easy to define the separation between the two spaces...is the factory a tilt up concrete and the wing brick built? Does any part of office wing internally encroach into the factory space..or visa versa? Within the MPR's is a very good section about vertically and horizontally attached buildings and how to define where the separation is. Perhaps you could review that first and then re-post.

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc. Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 535 Thumbs Up

Barry, I'm sorry, what's MPR?

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Joann Lee Heitman Architects Inc. Jan 08 2014 LEEDuser Member 535 Thumbs Up

Barry, I got it! Min. Program Requirement states that New Construction must include the building in its entirety. Thanks for directing me to the right source!

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Torsten Biernat Baumann Consulting
Dec 26 2013
LEEDuser Member
110 Thumbs Up

LEED CS, do all techn. systems need to meet the requirements?

An office building is undergoing a renovation of all tenant areas, including some of the overall techn. systems, see list below.
The project team wants to use Major Renovation / CS. Can this system be used although the ventilation requirements for the parking garage are not met? We know this is part of prerequisite IEQp1, but since this is an existing building and they will not do anything in the parking garage we think it should be possible to exclude this.

As an alternative, could CI be used, despite the fact that 1 tenant will occupy the complete building? The reference guide seems to exclude that, since it states that "tenants who do not occupy the entire building are eligible".

More information about the project are listed below.
• 170.000sf existing office building
• All tenant areas + lobby are gutted and built out
• The parking garage and technical rooms remain
• Lighting will be changed in all tenant areas and lobby
• Exterior sun shading will be added to some of the façades
• Chillers will be replaced
• Cooling tower stays
• AHUs will stay for the most part, duct work in tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. is new

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Kevin Short
Dec 17 2013
Guest
245 Thumbs Up

LEED-CI Gold without LEED-CS ?

We are renovating a 60,000 sq ft office building in SF. In permitting our base building work, we were able to prove to the city that our scope does not trigger the city mandated LEED Gold requirement. However, we may get a single tenant to occupy the building, in which case their TI permit may trigger the LEED Gold requirement.

If the base building does not have a LEED Cerification, would the tenant still be able to achieve a LEED-CI Gold rating? Our project will be very green, basically a LEED-CS Silver equivalent (we just have no intention of pursuing the LEED process ourselves). Thanks

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Dec 17 2013 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Kevin,

The tenant could absolutely attempt CI without being in a CS base building. Locating themselves in a CS building would only help them to achieve more points. This is why LEED certified buildings are more easily marketable to tenants who are seeking CI certification. Hope that helps!

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Johnathan Woodside Mechanical Engineer Gresham Smith & Partners
Dec 13 2013
LEEDuser Member
204 Thumbs Up

Which system NC or CI?

I am currently working on an airport terminal renovation project; 2 seperate terminals (non-contiguous) will be renovated (intending to register as 2 seperate projects).

The scope of the project involves primarily interior renovation, interior walls, some restroom fixture replacement, some ceiling upgrades, some flooring and lighting upgrades, but will not be for either entire terminal, and will include no major mechanical systems, building structure or building envelope. The building is airport owned with only a few tenants.

Can the CI rating system be used for certification? Or is it more appropriate to use another rating system?

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Dec 13 2013 LEEDuser Member 1684 Thumbs Up

Johnathan,

It sounds like CI will be your best bet in this situation. Good luck!

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Johnathan Woodside Mechanical Engineer, Gresham Smith & Partners Dec 16 2013 LEEDuser Member 204 Thumbs Up

What is the maximum square footage or envelope that can be added or modified under CI?

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