LEED Rating System Selection Q&A

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Architect,Principal / Sustainability AlfaTech Mar 10 2010 LEEDuser Member
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Is there a written guideline about which LEED 2009 rating system to use for a specific project? I want to have something written (in PDF or Word) w/o getting onto LEED Online to go through the rating system selector. I need this to send it to a client.

LEEDuser Editor's note: This single forum question has turned into the principle place on LEEDuser where questions of rating system selection are discussed. Please post your questions and answers below! Most questions can be resolved by referring to USGBC's rating system selection guidance.

794 Comments

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Maria Isabel Conde Owner Aqua Terra (Panama) S.A.
Aug 17 2016
LEEDuser Member
165 Thumbs Up

High-rise Residences: NC or C&S?

Hello,

We have a project that wants to pursue LEED v2009 certification. The building is mixed-use but mostly residential (2 levels will be for commercial use, 4 levels for office and approx. 20 for residential apartments).

The commercial and office spaces won’t have any interior fit-out done, and the residences will have the hard floors installed, and kitchen + bathrooms + walk-in closets all furnished, but not interior fit-out will be done on the rest of the apartment (bedrooms, living room, dining, bar), only the hard floors will be installed in that areas.

It is also important to say that lighting and HVAC won’t be installed.

Since most of the project is residential we thought that it could be certified under New Construction but now that we know that lighting and HVAC won’t be installed we are thinking it could be Core & Shell.

Can we pursue for a Core & Shell certification?

Thanks in advance for your time,

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Jennifer Isaac Electrical Engineer Commissioning Agents Inc.
Jun 15 2016
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LEED Rating System for tenant in existing building

Project Location: United States

My client is a pharmaceutical facility that occupies part of the area of an existing building. The pharmaceutical facility space went into major renovations about 4 years ago and has been in operation in this building over 3 years. The facility does not share utilities with the rest of the building. The client is interested in obtain LEED Certification for the facility. What would be the LEED rating system applicable to this facility?

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Yulia Chen
Jun 14 2016
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O+M: Retail or ID+C: CI

Project Location: United States

Hi,

We are a tenant occupying 30% of a multi-tenant building. The office was last renovated in 2011.

Is it possible for us to go for Commercial Interior cert even though we missed the ID+C requirement of submission the application within 2 years after substantial project completion?

Or should we go for O+M: Retail, regardless of the fact that office space doesn't really look like a retail space?

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Claire PIMET S'pace environnement
Jun 10 2016
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C&S or NC ?

Project Location: France

I’m contacting you regarding a project in the center of Paris. The client wants to go with a LEED certification on this project. The project is an existing building and the major refurbishment development aims to refurbish office spaces (5355m²) and retail space (2030m²).
The future tenant is known by the owner.

My question is regarding the certification type:
- regarding the office spaces : the owner is going to do the entire refurbishement of the surface. Therefore from our understanding the scheme to go for is major renovation.
- regarding the shop space on the other way the future tenant want to do his own fit out certification.

Is it possible for the future tenant to achieved this if the shell of the shop spaces is not Leed certified?

Do my client need to do a core&shell certification on the shop space ?

Thanks for your advice

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OSCAR DE LA RED LEED AP BD+C PROMEC
May 30 2016
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Major renovation for NC and C&S

If there is not an exterior Work on envelope but there is a core MEP alteration ,could a project be certified as a NC LEED Project (or C&S)? According to the rating system selection guidance it seems to me that a major renovation must imply an exterior shell modification, isn´t it? Or you only will lost the asociated credits and ignore the prerequisites requirements if there is something mandatory?

Does the modification of the existing interior louvers or draperires, could be considered as envelope work ?

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Ankur Khandelwal LEED Analyst and Energy Manager Green Living, LLC
May 25 2016
LEEDuser Member
11 Thumbs Up

LEEDv4 - College Building Which Rating?

We have a project in Texas which is having two Academic buildings (not connected) in a College, both of 4 floors having Lecture Theaters and Library. Will this be resisted in LEEDv4 BD+C: New Construction and Major Renovation or in LEEDv4 BD+C: Schools?

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FRAGISKOS LEVANTIS LEED AP BD+C SUSTAIN O.E.
May 02 2016
LEEDuser Member
373 Thumbs Up

CI or NC?

Dear all,
A client of mine is building a convention center and he will be operating it. Core and Shell works have been completed. However they are not well documented. Interior works will commence shortly. Can the project be certified by CI? (for 100% of interior space).
Thank you.

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. May 02 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

I'm not aware of any reason you couldn't certify the interiors as LEED-CI. Something similar was done at Vodafone Village in Milan, Vodafone occupies the entire huge complex but chose to just certify the interiors.

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FRAGISKOS LEVANTIS LEED AP BD+C, SUSTAIN O.E. May 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 373 Thumbs Up

Nadav thank you very much for your swift reply.

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ABDUL MUTHALIB MOHAMED INNOWELL ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL PVT LTD
Apr 22 2016
LEEDuser Member
287 Thumbs Up

LEED NC: MR or LEED EBOM

We have a manufacturing facility that under going addition of 30% of total floor area and wish to apply for LEED certification.

Can we use the LEED NC? or
Should we use LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 22 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

At that level of addition, you have a choice. Since you're below 40% the conventional choice would be LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. But it's big enough an area that if you wanted to do NC, it's fairly justifiable.

The simple choice is EBOM but if see advantages to doing things like a whole building energy model, you could do NC.

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ABDUL MUTHALIB MOHAMED INNOWELL ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL PVT LTD Apr 23 2016 LEEDuser Member 287 Thumbs Up

Thanks a lot, Tristan.

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C Livet Consulting
Apr 14 2016
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Residential building

We have a residential building looking for certification. Which rating system would be more appropiate? New Construction or Core& Shell?
Many thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 14 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Ana, how many stories? How many units? Will the interiors be fit out, or is it a core and shell project?

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C, Livet Consulting Apr 14 2016 Guest 86 Thumbs Up

16 units of 22 stories each. We don´t know if the interiors will be fit out, but we want to give the client the most appropriate rating system. Which would it be? New Construction or Core and shell?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 14 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Definitely LEED-NC unless the scope is really just the core and shell.

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Belén Valladares López Mrs, Valladares Ingenieria Apr 15 2016 LEEDuser Member 87 Thumbs Up

We are working in a residential project.
Entrance level is semi-buried due to site level. This level includes mail hall with elevator and stair, common areas like gym, spa and access to exterior pool. This level also includes parking areas and amenities.

There are three levels above this one than include 2 dwellings per level. Final level is linked to exterior private terraces than include pool, restroom and kitchen.

Can we consider this project as LEED-NC?.

Thanks in advantage

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 15 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

It sounds to me like LEED for Homes or LEED for Homes – Multifamily Midrise is the best fit here.

There has been flexibility to do these projects under LEED-NC, particularly before the multifamily track existed. But now that it exists you might be better off using it.

If you want to do NC I would double-check with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). before proceeding too far.

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Belén Valladares López Mrs, Valladares Ingenieria Apr 15 2016 LEEDuser Member 87 Thumbs Up

Thankyou so much, Tristan

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C, Livet Consulting Apr 18 2016 Guest 86 Thumbs Up

Thanks Tristan, we'll definitely go for NC!

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Mohammad Kamali UBC Jun 05 2016 Guest 5 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan,

I am doing my PhD in life cycle sustainability comparisons of off-site buildings (built by modular construction) and on-site traditional buildings. The results will help to choose more sustainable construction method. In addition, it can also be used for existing off-site and on-site buildings to see which criteria should be addressed to improve the sustainability. Buildings are residential and up to 3 floor (or maybe 4). I have selected a number of sustainability criteria based on literature review. Now I need to know the benchmark (optimum) value of each criterion. One of the main references to get the benchmark values is LEED. I was wondering which LEED should be used in this regard? NC of Homes? Thanks a lot, Mohammad

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Kasandra Martin Designer
Apr 09 2016
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LEED 2009 EBOM

I have an office building that is building a 2000 sq ft addition of offices. For EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. I will include the entire building and not just the addition correct?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 09 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Kasandra, yes, LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. is a whole building rating system, so include the entire building.

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Ghaith Moufarege
Apr 06 2016
LEEDuser Member
9722 Thumbs Up

Auditorium - Core Learning or Ancilliary Learning space?

Hello,
We have a new building on a K12 school campus. The building includes 1 big auditorium (300 seats) and a gymnasium.
We think the auditorium should be classified as Ancillary Learning space (not Core Learning space) as it is not a formal learning space? Do you agree?
By not having any core learning space, we could register the project under LEED NC and not LEED for schools, correct?
Thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 09 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Ghaith, I would agree with you.

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Joel Bennett JON International
Mar 29 2016
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v2009 CORE AND SHELL FOR RETAIL

Just a quick question; is it possible to certify a retail building under C&S rating system rather than Retail NC?

Thank you all in advance!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 09 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Joel, if it's a full fit-out then that would not be a good fit. Could you do it if you really wanted to? I would get approval from GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..

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Heraldo Muñoz
Mar 05 2016
LEEDuser Member
13 Thumbs Up

Leed NC Retail or CI Retail?

Project Location: Paraguay

Hello I am leading a LEED Certification for a Supermarket.

My client is a supermarket that leases the supermarket land for 20 year or more, and in there they will construct their stand alone supermarket.
They are about to rebuild a store and they have the complete control over the entire building´s envelope.

The thing is that they have one company that owns the infrastructure and another that operates the infrastructure, that´s why they are asking me which Certification type adequate for us.. New Construction Retail or Commercial Interiors Retail.

The other thing to mention is that after the summer season is over, they close the supermarket for 6 months and when they reopen they change some of the interior equipments as ovens, cash machines, refrigerators, etc.

Which one would be more appropriate and why?

Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 09 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Heraldo, it sounds like NC Retail. Different owner/operator shouldn't be an issue.

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al-emran hossain Green Associate & MEP consultant Bangladesh Green Building Academy
Feb 27 2016
LEEDuser Member
26 Thumbs Up

Energy modeling for LEED project (v3) requirement or not

Project Location: Bangladesh

We are going to start LEED project (Gold, points 66) in RMG factory at Bangladesh , if we will not consider in energy modeling for v3, that will accept or not , and required then which energy modeling software will be best for beginner.

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Feb 27 2016 LEEDuser Member 812 Thumbs Up

Here is a list of software: http://www.buildingenergysoftwaretools.com/ - check the box for "whole building" when you search.

I can say anecdotally that many energy modeling teams use eQUEST and Open Studio which are free for you to download, or Trane TRACE which your engineer may have access to or the suite of Autodesk products.

There are many others that comply with the requirements of ASHRAE 90.1.

This document might also help you: http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs7795.pdf

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Sustainability/Energy Engineer, CEM, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP Feb 28 2016 Guest 1035 Thumbs Up

Yes. A Whole Building Energy Simulation according to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 is required to show the percentage improvement of the design model from the baseline model. You need to find minimum savings of 10% for New Construction for the pre-requisite and hence, more energy savings will lead to more points in the related credit.

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ABDELHAMID BESHARA MASADER
Feb 23 2016
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Campus approach in a gated residential compound or ND?

Project Location: Egypt

We have a gated Residential Compound consisting of around 60 buildings - 4 to 5 stories high - different models. The buildings are distributed on two main pieces of land of equal areas separated by a main road. the whole compound is owned and will be operated by one developer. 4 out of the 60 residential buildings have commercial stores on the first floor. There is also one social club building + one commercial and administrative building (area 70,000 sf and gross area is 200,000 sf) + one nursery. The total land area is 3,000,000 sf - the actual building area is 700,000 sf - The Gross building area is 2,800,000 sf.

We want to propose to the client the following approaches :
1- ND-plan with certification of the commercial and administrative building (the problem is NPDp3 - connectivity because of the gated aspect)
2- Certifying the whole lot using Campus approach and LEED BD+C Core and Shell.
3- Only certifying the club (NC) and the mall (core and shell)
Are these approaches technically applicable ? are we getting it right?

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Apr 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3533 Thumbs Up

Abdelhamid, regarding the ND v4 Plan option, there is an ND minimum program requirement of two buildings, and you're correct that any part of the circulation system counted towards connectivity cannot be gated, plus there must be a through-connection on the project boundary at least every 800 feet.
Eliot

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Curt Pascoe P.E., LEED AP BD+C Ryan Companies US, Inc.
Feb 12 2016
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1406 Thumbs Up

LEED Selection - High Rise Residential

Project Location: United States

I am working on a unique project. 30 story existing historic building, office. It is being gut rehabbed and turned into 25 stories of residential, plus 5 stories of speculative (empty) office/retail space. The units will have individual water heaters but central heating and cooling plants. I believe this is best fit by LEED NCv2009, but wanted to get some secondary opinions.

Additionally, the project includes an existing parking garage which will provide parking for tenants. There is no work being proposed for this garage. Can it, or should it, be included within the project boundary for credits such as covered parking?

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Victoria Tsamis Director of Sustainability , Edwards & Zuck Mar 30 2016 LEEDuser Member 30 Thumbs Up

Hi Curt,

Have you resolved which rating system to go with? I am working on a similar full building gut renovation project. We are turning a hotel into condos and I was wondering the same thing!

Thanks!

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Hannah Silver
Feb 12 2016
LEEDuser Member
19 Thumbs Up

choosing between CS and Hospitality

Project Location: United States

Hi, we have a large project coming up that will be about 43% hotel and the rest CS. Would there be some benefit to selecting Hospitality, as we are within the "project's team choice" 40-60% floor area range? We're thinking if there's some consideration for the use of far more plumbing in hotels, etc, then maybe Hospitality is the way to go. Additionally, my team is more familiar with 2009, but I'm thinking that our location in downtown Portland will be advantageous for many of the LT/SS credits with little effort.

Thoughts?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 10 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Hannah, with Hospitality in v4 there are a few key credits where the requirements are different based on hotel considerations. But it's not a completely different rating system. Your note about LT credits being an advantage is also worth noting. I would tend toward suggesting v4 for you, but it's not a slam dunk.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant DCarbon
Feb 11 2016
LEEDuser Member
1108 Thumbs Up

Hotel development - Multiple Buildings

Would a project including the development of a luxurious resort hotel be eligible for certification under v4 NC? The project will consist of different buildings (reception, spa facilities, apartments, etc.) all serving the same programmable use. In other words, the project will consist of multiple structures physically connected by circulation, and mechanical rooms. In addition, the structures (buildings) will not have dependency from each other since all of them are needed to make the hotel development operational.
We have been confused because LEED v4 Ref.Guide (p.29) refers that “If another building within the LEED project boundary is eligible for LEED certification, it may be included in the certification if USGBC’s multiple building guidance is followed.” Does this mean that we have to use the multiple application guidance, even though the buildings comprising the project cannot operate independently?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 10 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Are they interdependent in terms of HVAC and energy systems, etc.? It sounds like you are sayinag that they are interdependent because they are all part of the same facility, which is not the same. It sounds more like they are separate buildings that would be certified under multiple buildings guidance.

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Apr 11 2016 LEEDuser Member 1108 Thumbs Up

Hi Tristan, after digging in the addenda table we saw that hotels, resorts, and resort properties, as defined by ENERGY STAR building rating purposes, may include more than one physically distinct building in a single LEED project, as long as each building is less than 25,000 sq. ft, which would allow all resort buildings to be included into one project.

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Valentin Grimaud Thermal Engineer TERAO Green Building Engineering
Feb 09 2016
LEEDuser Member
1268 Thumbs Up

LEED CS 2009 Update from october 2010

Project Location: France

I am currently looking for a PDF version of LEED rating system CS 2009 updated from october 2010.

Current version on USGBC website is updated from 2013, but the project I'm currently working on was registered on an older version.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 10 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Valentin, I have the original 2009 version. With that, you could use the LEED addenda database to figure out which updates apply to an Oct 2010 date. Contact me via this website if you want me to send it to you.

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Shijo John
Feb 03 2016
Guest
8 Thumbs Up

Rating system for an Existing Office space

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

Dear All,

We have an existing office (around 2-3 years old) which we want to get LEED certified. However, it is a part (tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.) of mixed-use building. It is not clear to me which rating system to select as LEED O&M rating is for existing whole building and not for tenant spaces.
Would it be acceptable to apply for LEED CI or any other rating system?

Request your valuable suggestions on the same.

Thanks and Regards,

Shijo John

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 10 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Shijo, as you indicate, LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. is for whole buildings. Yet, LEED-CI is not really applicable because it is designed around significant fit-out being done on the space.

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Mahesh M Energy Auditor and Green building expert TransGreen Sustainability Solutions
Dec 07 2015
Guest
32 Thumbs Up

LEED ND Plan - Is it a permanent certification

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

We are prospecting a development in the middle-east for LEED ND certification under V4. The project is currently in the planning phase and therefore we propose to apply for the "LEED ND Plan" certification.

Our query is whether the "LEED ND Plan" certification awarded during the design stage will be a permanent certification or not?
Is it mandatory that the project should also go for "LEED ND Built Project" certification after the completion of construction?

As per LEED ND 2009 FAQs, the project must apply for Stage 3 certification (after construction) - which will be the final permanent certification.

Does the same apply for LEED ND V4. We are not able to find any guidance on this. A LEED ND V4 FAQ or process guide (similar to the LEED ND 2009 process guide) will be of much help.

Thanks in advance

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Eliot Allen LEED AP-ND, Principal, Criterion Planners Apr 11 2016 LEEDuser Expert 3533 Thumbs Up

Mahesh, if you select the Plan rating system you receive certification of the project plan, and there is no requirement to return after construction to obtain certification under the Built Project rating system. Both Plan and Built Project certifications are 'permanent' in the sense that they don't expire and there is no periodic re-certification requirement.
Eliot

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Ana Paula Quiros Architect, LEED AP BD+C Livet Consulting
Nov 30 2015
Guest
86 Thumbs Up

Core and Shell with Commercial Interiors.

Hello,
Is it possible to exclude the commercial area of a building to be certified as CS and then certify that commercial area as CI?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Apr 10 2016 LEEDuser Moderator

Ana, I don't see why not. You're making more work for yourself, but I assume there is some reason. I could check with GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). because it's non-standard.

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Maria Papiez Sustainability Lead BBH Design
Nov 17 2015
LEEDuser Member
32 Thumbs Up

Building use change during construction - how to proceed?

My team has just taken on a renovation/fit-out project. The building in which the project will take place is brand new, and is about 4 weeks from construction completion. It was pursuing LEED NC, but the use of the building changed abruptly from industrial testing to office and will require demolition and renovation that were not part of the original design and LEED package. Credits were not been submitted. As part of the new design team, I am working to determine the best path. 1) Can the project still pursue the original LEED NC, just with an added demolition/renovation phase? 2) Would it work better to split the project in two and certify the Core and Shell (original construction) and then use Commercial Interiors for the fit-out (my team, new design). 3) Would the new project classify as major renovation and pursue a new LEED NC package? Any guidance is greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Maria, how extensive is the renovation? I am wondering if it is a "major renovation" or more minor.

It sounds like you can't submit the originally planned NC certification. How well was that documented? Could it be feasibly picked up by your team and turned into a modified NC certification?

If so, I think that would best fit the intent of the project and LEED. If not, then it's going to be hard to do CS in any case. I would look at CI, but you'll need to provide more info and do some analysis according to rating system selection to know if that fits.

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FABIO VIERO Head of Sustainability Manens-Tifs s.p.a.
Nov 03 2015
LEEDuser Member
1201 Thumbs Up

mixed use

Hi all,
we are working on a refurbishment project located outside US and we are looking for applying LEED v4.
The four stories building consist in a mix use as follows:
• Museum: more than 75% GFA (including support offices, kitchen, warehouse etc.) and roughly 30%
• Residential: about 25% GFA (2 residential units on the top floor and another one on the first floor)
Considering that:
a) the building is entirely owned and managed by the same entity
b) the predominant use is museum
Could you please confirm whether the most appropriate rating system should be LEED BD+C (Major Renovation)?
Thank you in advance

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Fabio, yes, I would go with BD+C here.

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Hassaan Sipra
Oct 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
22 Thumbs Up

LEED Pakistan -- Availability and details

Project Location: Pakistan

I am interested in finding out if LEED has guidelines for Pakistan, specifically Islamabad, as I am doing a project for one of my master's courses in Green Buildings in that area. The project will highlight various sustainable and green practices in the design phase of a 1/8 acre residential plot for a family home.

Thus far, I have not been able to find LEED in the Islamabad region, although there are a couple of buildings built in Karachi using the LEED rating system. However, they are commercial buildings. At the moment, I am considering trying to find a similar climate region to Islamabad in India and try to see the applicability of LEED India to this plot in Islamabad.

Since I am new to LEED as a framework, and a novice at green building, I would appreciate thoughts and comments from experts. I am also in contact with a few architects in Pakistan, and am thinking about conducting a survey on green building accomplishments. Is that a good idea, or would it be a waste of time? What are some definite things that LEEDUser members think are necessary to include in such a survey?

Would appreciate candid responses, as I try to formulate the scope of this project.

Thank you!

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Susan Di Giulio Project Manager, Zinner Consultants Oct 21 2015 LEEDuser Member 1823 Thumbs Up

I see that you haven't gotten a response yet. It appears that Pakistan has a Green Building Council, so start there:
http://pakistangbc.org/beta/about/

Also, you can go to this page at USGBC to see the LEED registered and certified buildings in your country.
http://www.usgbc.org/projects

Below the search box, select "country" and them type in Pakistan to the right.

Good luck!

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Saud Abdul Rasheed Sustainability/Energy Engineer, CEM, PMP, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, Estidama PQP Nov 10 2015 Guest 1035 Thumbs Up

LEED does not have specific guidelines for Pakistan or any other country. Its just that some credits are easily achievable in some regions while difficult to achieve in other regions. LEED is a rating system being used globally. There are few LEED certified buildings in Pakistan and LEED is not that famous in our country. The number of registered projects is also limited. There is Pakistan Green Building Council as Susan said but I am not sure if they are having a lot of LEED projects going on.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Nov 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

Susan got there before me but yes, there are 17 LEED certified projects in Pakistan which is actually quite an achievement. Your GBC are great people so get in touch!

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Kerrie Racicot
Sep 22 2015
LEEDuser Member
96 Thumbs Up

LEED NC vs LEED HC

Hi there,

We are working on project (an Ambulatory Care Center) that is primarily out-patient, however the ER is 24 hours and the Pharmacy is 24 hours. There are only 2 in-patient rooms in the entire 162,000 square foot buildings. Since most of the building is not 24-hour and is out-patient, can LEED NC be used?

Thank you!

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Sep 22 2015 LEEDuser Expert 20761 Thumbs Up

Are you talking about having 2 'Same Day Stay' rooms or are they really doing a 2 bed inpatient unit? Language really matters here. Those 2 beds are licensed when ED beds are not. That license requires certain building features you may or may not have. Please get absolute clarification on those beds. The hours of operation for the ED and Pharmacy don't matter. Patients shouldn't be in ED over 23 hours and those instances are tracked, discussed, and monitored.

If you have 2 Same Day Stay beds, you're all outpatient and good to go with NC which is what I would want to do. Here's hoping that someone is just using 'inpatient' to describe that they are different than ED. My opinion is that if you do have inpatient, the project is HC.

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Ghaith Moufarege
Sep 18 2015
LEEDuser Member
9722 Thumbs Up

Underground parking areas included?

Project Location: Lebanon

Hello,
We are trying to determine which rating system to use, NC or C&S, for a mixed use project. The project consists of underground parking levels, an office building that will be totally finished upon project completion & a residential part that will be core & shell. Could anyone help in clarifying whether the areas of the underground parking levels should be included in the calculations of the NC areas versus the C&S ones, to determine which rating system to pursue, based on the 40/60 rule?
Thank you.

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Jon Clifford LEED-AP BD+C, GREENSQUARE Sep 18 2015 LEEDuser Expert 5046 Thumbs Up

The definition of gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) (GFA) specifically excludes “floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles.” Therefore, you would not include the garage deck areas in floor area calculations.

Garage construction materials would count toward MR credits, and its energy use would figure into energy models. However, since a parking garage is unconditioned (per ASHRAE-90.1), non-regularly occupied, open to the outdoors, and separated from occupied interior space, a garage is NOT interior space and is, therefore, exempt from IEQc4 VOCA volatile organic compound (VOC) is a carbon compound that vaporizes (becomes a gas) at normal room temperatures. VOCs contribute to air pollution directly and through atmospheric photochemical reactions (excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides and carbonates, and ammonium carbonate) to produce secondary air pollutants, principally ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate. restrictions (see LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. #1767: http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=1767).

For more on how to calculate non-certifiable areas (such as parking garages) as part of a LEED project, see this discussion on the NC-2009 EAp2 forum: http://www.leeduser.com/comment/redirect/59216.

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Jeroen Sap LEED AP BD+C Deerns Nederland B.V.
Sep 18 2015
Guest
54 Thumbs Up

LEED rating system change from CS to NC?

Project Location: Netherlands

I am working on a Core&Shell office building project. The owner has not yet found a tenant so we are preparing design documentation for LEED CS. I was wondering; what happens when the owners finds a tenant for 100% of the office gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) half way through the LEED certification process? Will this disqualify the project to continue with the CS rating system? Or can we still go for CS although a tenant is involved as well? I couldn't find clear guidance on this so I hope anyone knows how to deal with this situation.

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Christian Bösselmann Senior Energy & Sustainability Consultant, a°blue / atmosgrad GmbH Oct 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 87 Thumbs Up

HI Jeroen,
if you have registered the project you can to my knowledge change pretty much everything EXCEPT the rating schemes. The submittal forms differ between the schemes.
So I am afraid you would need to start all over again.
regarsd
Christian

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Markus Henning M.Eng Facility Management LEED AP BD+C | LEED GCP, Alpha Immobilien Consulting GmbH Oct 22 2015 Guest 338 Thumbs Up

Hello Jeroen and Christian

"Will this disqualify the project to continue with the CS rating system? Or can we still go for CS although a tenant is involved as well?"

That depends on two things. 1st: has the owner control over the fit out of the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. or is this 100% in the hand of the tenant? And how is the contract with the construction company including tenant space or not?

You can change all data including the rating system of the project if you do not have submit any data for review, without additional cost. If the project pass any review (Pre-Cert …..) you can not change the rating system and a new registration will be necessary.

Hope that helps

Best regards
Markus

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Katie Peterschmidt Associate Director, CORE Steward, Cooper Carry Mar 02 2016 LEEDuser Member 147 Thumbs Up

I concur with Markus. It really depends upon the contract. We had this happen on one of our projects. The tenant work was done by a separate contract, different design team and different construction contract. Therefore, it turned into two LEED projects: LEED CS for the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, etc. and the tenant opted to pursue LEED CI at the same time.

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Philippa Cameron Architect CH2M
Sep 17 2015
Guest
95 Thumbs Up

School Expansion with Multiple Blocks

Hi,
We have a school expansion project to introduce a new middle school on a site which already has an existing primary and secondary school present. We wish to establish the most suitable certification strategy to recommend to the Client.
The new proposal introduces a number of separate new blocks as part of the same overall design. Some blocks are physically linked but some are not. All middle school teaching spaces (total 119,000sqft) are linked physically with internal space, however there is a new auditorium (26,450sqft) which sits separately nearby, as do two office and training blocks (31,800sqft + 33,800sqft) which function independently to the middle school.
In the MPR guidance it appears to suggest that independent blocks can potentially be considered as one building for Schools projects, however our blocks exceed the recommended 25,000sqft. Is there any flexibility in this? We would like, as a minimum, to consider the auditorium and middle school as one building for LEED purposes.
If considered as separate buildings, but under cover of a single registration, the rating system guidance also suggests that non-academic buildings can pursue Schools certification. Would we be better with one building under Schools (middle school and auditorium) and the two other office/training buildings under NC, or with the office/training buildings under Schools as well? Can we follow a Campus approach with three buildings under one registration, or would we require three separate registrations?
Thanks!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Philippa, I would recommend getting GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).'s advice on this. There are a number of different factors here and definitely room for interpretation. It sounds like your preference is to combine the projects and certifications as much as possible, which would also be my inclination, assuming the same design/construction team is doing all the projects. But because this diverges a bit from GBCI guidance I would want to get its approval.

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CHRISTIAN LUTJEN ARCHITECT SHAH KAWASAKI ARCHITECTS
Sep 01 2015
Guest
108 Thumbs Up

Commercial Interiors 2009 v3 - Documentation Reuse and Boundary

Project Location: United States

Hi all,

We are embarking on our office's first LEED Commercial Interiors project. The existing envelope received 2009 v3 LEED Gold for Core and Shell in 2014. Will it be acceptable for us to reuse pertinent documentation for the new tenant improvement? There seems to be a number of points that overlap the two rating systems. Also, the original project included a tenant improvement in approximately a total of 30% floor area of the 1st floor of a two-story building. Seemingly, we have the option of pursuing two separate CI projects or grouping them together as one. There is one owner and the interior existing walls clearly delineate the spaces. Is it correct that we have both of these options? If we pursue one project, will it be acceptable to exclude the existing tenant-improvement floor area?

Thanks for any help you can provide.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Christian, one of the great things about CI certification following a CS project is that you can use that documentation, where relevant. So, yes to that.

From your description I'm not getting a clear picture of the various projects and how they related to each other, but it is possible to combine non-contiguous interior spaces in one LEED project. You should review the MPR3 guidance on that.

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner Jacobs Engineering
Aug 27 2015
LEEDuser Member
1168 Thumbs Up

LEED-NC or LEED for Homes (and v3 vs v4)?

Project Location: United States

Hello,

I've tried calling USGBC, who told me to email certinfo@usgbc.org. I did that a little over 2 weeks ago, and have yet to get a response. I've also tried posting a question on this page on USGBC (http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-2009-rating-system-selection-guidance), but also no response in over 2 weeks. So, I'm hoping maybe this is a better place to get guidance...

I am looking for clarification on a project we have in development so that we can determine our options for rating systems.

Our project is ~20k SF, residential, 5 floors total with the ground level being parking and the floors above being residential units. As I understand it, we can currently choose between the following for our project as we see fit:
- New Construction, v2009
- New Construction, v4
- LEED for Homes, Multi-Family Mid-Rise, v2010
- LEED for Homes, v4

Can someone please help confirm if the assumptions above are correct?
Thank you for your help.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

Hello Emily,

Your assumptions above are correct. Based on your project description you have 4 rating systems to select from.

Dave

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Aug 28 2015 LEEDuser Member 1168 Thumbs Up

Ah, thanks so much!

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Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Aug 28 2015 LEEDuser Expert 847 Thumbs Up

I'm sorry you haven't been able to get a timely answer from Usgbc or gbciThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)..
Dave is not 100% correct.

LEED NC v4 is not an option for a multi family project up to 8 stories.

Although NC v2009 can be used, Usgbc recommends projects like the one you described use LEED Midrise, as that rating system is tailored specifically to that space type.

The midrise vs homes issue is only relevant if you have all in unit heating and cooling equipmentThe equipment used for cooling room air in a building for human comfort. (not central), and more than 80% of the conditioned floor area is in unit space as well. If you meet both of those qualifications, and are 4-5 stories above grade, you can use Homes instead of Midrise.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Aug 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

Hi Asa,

A while back GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). provided me the following guidance "for projects that qualify as a mid-rise you have the option of using LEED for Mid-RIse or LEED NC".

I did not know that this guidance doesn't translate to v4.

Thank you for your guidance, it is much appreciated!

Dave

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emily reese Sustainability Consultant / Facility Planner, Jacobs Engineering Aug 29 2015 LEEDuser Member 1168 Thumbs Up

Asa,

So to summarize, if the project wishes to pursue v3, they can choose between LEED-NC and LEED for Mid-rise 2010.
If they wish to pursue v4, my project should pursue LEED for Mid-rise 2010 and does not really have the option to pursue LEED-NC v4 or LEED for Homes unless the above mentioned criteria apply.
Is that correct?
Thanks for your help.

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Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Aug 31 2015 LEEDuser Expert 847 Thumbs Up

Yes, for this 5 story project (and those of similar scope) you are correct Emily.

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Mark Donahue Price Architects, Inc.
Aug 26 2015
LEEDuser Member
16 Thumbs Up

Move-in versus construction

Project Location: United States

Is there a system that can be used for a simple move in (furniture only) for a commercial office space in a non-LEED-certified building?

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Melissa Wrolstad Senior Project Manager, CodeGreen Solutions Aug 26 2015 LEEDuser Member 3031 Thumbs Up

I'd do a thorough analysis to see if the project could qualify to apply for LEED-CI. You may find that you need to change up things like water fixtures / lights / waste hauler / etc to meet prerequisite requirements.

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Elisa Sirombo Architect
Aug 21 2015
Guest
45 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or LEED for Healthcare?

Project Location: Italy

Dear All,
We are working on a project located in Italy, which would pursue the LEED certification under a 2009 version and we are wondering about the most appropriate rating system to use.
The project refers to a new construction that have the following features:
• It concerns a long-term care facility for rehabilitation and senior housing services
• It will be accredited to the National Health Office
• It includes mixed use facilities supporting the main use, such as:
○ Fitness area
○ Place of Worship
○ Offices
○ Kitchen and canteen
○ Surgeries
• Rooms for patients occupy around the 50% of the GFA.

The Owner would like to pursue, for this project, LEED Italia 2009 Nuove Costruzioni e Ristrutturazioni, which is a NC rating system, not specific for Heathcare facilitities.

Could you confirm that LEED Italia fits with this project?

Thank you.
Best regards.

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Aug 21 2015 LEEDuser Expert 20761 Thumbs Up

I think the first thing you need to do is understand the agreement between the USGBC and the LEED Italia group. LEED Italia would be my first stop. I do not know.

However, I do know LEED HC and if you were writing from the US, I would ask you to clarify your surgery use and how long a patient undergoing surgery would stay at the facility. Given the information you've provided, it could be a hospital and hospitals should be in LEED HC.

Good luck and let us know what you find.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Aug 22 2015 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

Elisa, I have done a LEED Italy project recently and found it to be nothing more than a translation of the BD+C v3 rating system. In your case you would need to apply BD+C Healthcare which makes much more sense for your project.

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Elisa Sirombo Architect Aug 24 2015 Guest 45 Thumbs Up

Thank you Susan and Emmanuel for your reply.
Surgery use is connected with the main function of the facility, that will be primary dedicated to the intensive rehabilitation, especially neuromuscular rehabilitation.
Following your advice, I suppose that LEED HC fits better for this project.

Best regards.
Elisa

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Elisa Sirombo Architect Sep 04 2015 Guest 45 Thumbs Up

Dear all,
If the project will be only a nursing home, do you think that LEED NC could be used?
Thank you in advance.
Elisa

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Christian Bösselmann Senior Energy & Sustainability Consultant a°blue / atmosgrad GmbH
Aug 13 2015
LEEDuser Member
87 Thumbs Up

Rating System Selection CI

Project Location: Germany

Dear all
I am hesitating whether the following project could obtain a CI certificate for the entire building:
-existing office building
-one entity owns the entire building
-interior works will be carried out for a new tenant occupying 65%GFA
-the remaining 40% GFA remain untouched and is currently occupied by other tenants

According to the 40/60 rule of thumb in the Rating System Selection Guide, the project would qualify for CI and the certificate would be granted to the entire building.

I am however not sure how to understand the wording on page 8 Ádditional Application Guidance´:

Maximum amount of work for interiors projects
If both the following two statements describe the project, then a whole building rating system, with the exception of LEED for Commercial Interiors or LEED for Retail: Commercial Interiors, should be used.
1) the entity conducting the work leases OR owns and controls 90% or more of the building that the space is located in (YES)
2)the same entity is conducting new construction or major renovation in 40% or more of the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) of the building (NO)

..what I do not understand is how the CI, being mentioend as an exception, is treated in this case?

The the area of the new tenant could be CI certified is clear. My question is, wether I can perform works on 60% GFA (meeting prerequisite on 100%) and then still label the entire buildilng as CI certified.

I very much would apreciate your answer on this one.
best regards
Christian

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 13 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Christian,

The CI rating system is just for interiors--it can't be used to certify a building as a whole. Even if you were to certify 100% of the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space., it would still just be an Interiors certification, not a whole building certification.

For the entire building to be LEED-certified, you have to use NC or one of the other whole-building rating systems (EB, Schools, etc.), so that things like whole-building energy use and landscaping, which are not covered in CI, are included appropriately.

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Christian Bösselmann Senior Energy & Sustainability Consultant, a°blue / atmosgrad GmbH Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 87 Thumbs Up

Hi Nadav,
thanks for your quick response. Sorry for not being specific enough. With my question whether CI would be applicable for the ´whole building´ I meant whether the owner is allowed to label this building as being LEED CI certified, despite him only having renovated 65%GFA? The remaining 35% GFA is also under his ownership, but currently occupied by tenants, and hence will not be refurbished.

So what is to be understood under the term ´whole building rating system´ or in other words, which LEED rating schemes do not count towards these?

best regards
Christian

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Jan Hesse Dipl.-Ing.(FH) | LEED AP ID+C, ALPHA Immobilien Consulting GmbH Aug 14 2015 Guest 242 Thumbs Up

Hi Christian,
as Nadav said before a building can not be CI-certified but only the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space..
Since your LEED-CI Scope probably refers only to the "new" rental space, even these areas are assessed by LEED (eg equipment, lighting, etc.). Or will the existing tenant space be in the scope of work and be evaluated with regard to all Prerequistes and Credits? Should this be the case, you should be able to certify the total leasable area (old & new tenant), as more than 60% of the lettable area will be undergoing a complete interior fit-out.
But remember that a CI certification will always be a certification of the tenant space. I think it is difficult to control another tenant concerning for example energy star certified equipment.

Best regards
Jan

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Christian Bösselmann Senior Energy & Sustainability Consultant, a°blue / atmosgrad GmbH Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 87 Thumbs Up

Hi Jan
thanks for you input. So the strategy woudl be to make sure Prerequisites are met by all tenants. Implemented measures for optimization with regards to lighting power consumption, fixtures could then be done in 65% of the GFA and weighted in their contribution to the overall building. - what do you think?

As you pointed out, the owner has no influence on the rating of the equipment. However I am quite confident that the equipment purchased will meet at least the minimum requriement.

MfG
Christian

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Jan Hesse Dipl.-Ing.(FH) | LEED AP ID+C, ALPHA Immobilien Consulting GmbH Aug 14 2015 Guest 242 Thumbs Up

I think LEED is not DGNB where you can show compliance in Credits by weighting. You have to show compliance for the entire space, i.e. the existing tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space..
I think the better system for this project is EB:OM with a performance period of 12 months after the new tenant moved in. The whole building is certified for the next 5 years and can be recertified also with different tenants then. But I´m not an EB:OM specialist - maybe I overlooked something there.

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Christian Bösselmann Senior Energy & Sustainability Consultant, a°blue / atmosgrad GmbH Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 87 Thumbs Up

Hi Jan
the lighting power and water consumption can be ´weighted´ by calculating the effect of efficient equipment only in portions of the building total installed capacity. The same way as if you woudl do with different kinds of equipment. But the prerequisites are to be met for all spaces in my opinion.
The whole problem is that I cannot conduct the performance period while the main tenant has left the buildng (leaving 65% of GFA vacant). In that case I would have to wait for the new tenant and then start the performance period. But the owner is interested in the LEED certificate in order to attract a new tenant. So the question is whether to do LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. before the space becomes vacant without having the chance to optimize PP-related credits, or to pursue a CI certification while doing the renovation works.
Looking at EBOM I have realized it is quite difficult to get your head around it , if one normaly is dealing with new construction.

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Jan Hesse Dipl.-Ing.(FH) | LEED AP ID+C, ALPHA Immobilien Consulting GmbH Aug 14 2015 Guest 242 Thumbs Up

I understand your point. What you are looking for is something like Core&Shell for an existing building. I think you will not find this in LEED - maybe BREEAMBuilding Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, the first widely used green building rating system, developed in the U.K. in the early 1990s, currently used primarily in the U.K. and in Hong Kong. fits better here.
But I'm curious if there are other opinions on this subject, since such requests keep coming.

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 14 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Given that the most appropriate approach for this scope is LEED-CI, it seems that the question is really about how the owner can legitimately market the project's LEED achievement. As long as you word the marketing materials carefully, I think the owner can get what they need quite easily. For example, as long as you talk about it as a LEED-certified "project" rather than a LEED-certified "building", there is no issue with it being CI rather than NC, and only part of the interior space. (Of course, you can't call it "LEED certified" until it has actually earned the certification.)

Also, you have the benefit of USGBC's branding guidelines, which actually discourage you from specifying which rating system was used. They prefer "LEED-certified" over "LEED-CI-certified." See page 11 of this document. Good luck!

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Jodie Clarke Sustainability Project Manager Unico Properties
Aug 04 2015
LEEDuser Member
15 Thumbs Up

LEED-CI vs. LEED-CI Retail

Project Location: United States

I have registered a restaurant project using the LEED-CI rating system but I'm now thinking that LEED-CI Retail might be the better rating system for the project.
Does anyone have experience with LEED-CI Retail for a restaurant and what is the best way to change rating systems once a project is registered if I pursue this route?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Jodie, I would recommend CI Retail in this case. Contact GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). to get their help moving your project over.

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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
Jul 28 2015
LEEDuser Member
3101 Thumbs Up

Rating system: NC, CI or EBOM?

Project Location: Vietnam

I seem to be posting on this thread constantly! I wish I had a straight-forward LEED project. My current concern is a single university building. They will renovate about 90% of the interior in 2 contiguous phases over 1-2 years, carrying out no exterior or envelope work except for a new canopy over a walkway (minor work). They will do some work to HVAC but are currently not planning a new system, only substantial revisions, and they will provide new w.c.s. During phase 1, about 60% of the building will be operational/ occupied, and during phase 2, about 45-50% of the building will be operational. I think this is an EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. that would start the Performance Period 1 year prior to handover, whilst ensuring that any Phase 1 work is done to LEED specification. However, recent rulings on CI projects indicate that though only 10% of the space is commercially-let, this could be a CI project. Or it could be NC due to the total area of the project that is being renovated. I will call GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). later tonight but would appreciate LEEDUser comment since I have had some very unclear phone advice in past on this type of issue.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

I never had a reply to this posting, does anyone want to offer advice? I proposed it as EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. and the owner are querying my advice.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Oct 26 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

LEED NC, CI, and EB all seem to be applicable based upon the information provided. When owner's ask our advice on projects that fall into various rating systems we build the applicable scorecards and see which one scores the highest and/or which prerequisites are most easily achieved.

if occupancy falls below 50% (prorated over the 12 months prior to submission to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). for review) then the project would not be allowed to pursue LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certification.

Hope this helps!

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OSCAR DE LA RED LEED AP BD+C, PROMEC Dec 21 2015 Guest 308 Thumbs Up

If there is not an exterior Work on envelope , I think it could not be certified as a NC LEED Project (or C&S),as a major renovation seems to imply an exterior shell modification according to rating system selection guidance , isn´it?

Could it be a NC even if there is not work on the exterior shell, for instance if there is need of a new certificade of occupancy and the primary function space cannot be used?

Does the modification of the existing interior louvers or draperires, could be considered as envelope work ?

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
Jul 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
1270 Thumbs Up

"incomplete spaces" treatment in LEED NC

1) An office building that is being certified under LEED NC will have 20% of its gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) without a complete interior fit-out at time of construction work completion. Construction scope of work for this area includes flooring (without floor finishing), ceiling, lighting and HVAC systems. This area will be left as an open-space. In the future the occupant (owner or tenant, decision will depend factors not related with building construction – e.g., market) may add partition walls and floor finishing to customize the open-space layout.

2) According to LEED INTERPRETATIONLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. ID 10102, for incomplete spaces calculations associated with pre-requisites and credits with established baselines (e.g., EAp.2 and associated credits) must assume that the proposed case is equivalent to the baseline.

3) In the case described in 1), this 20% of gross floor area may be considered an “incomplete space”. However, all the relevant systems and components relevant for EAp2 calculations (i.e., external walls, windows, HVAC systems, lighting systems) will be present at time of construction work completion.

My question is: shall we strictly follow the LEED Ruling 10102 and ignore the installed systems and components or may we model this area considering the installed systems and components ?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Pedro, this sounds like a question for our EAp2 forum, and you may find some useful guidance there as well.

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Pedro Ribeiro Director of Sustainability Edifícios Saudáveis Consultores
Jul 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
1270 Thumbs Up

LEED for New Construction vs LEED for Core & Shell

According to the example on p. 10 of LEED Rating System Selection Guide (June 2011 version), LEED for New Construction is the best rating system for cases where the majority (but not the totality) of the interior fit-out is installed by the owner.

Example:
«A new office is being constructed, and the interior fit‐out is being completed with the exception of furniture installation and interior paint application for the entire gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.). LEED for Core & Shell would be the result of a strict interpretation of this guidance because the fit‐out is not technically complete for at least 40% of gross floor area. However, LEED for New Construction is the best rating system for this project because the vast majority of the components that make up the interior fit out are complete.»

We are now working in a building that is very similar to the one described in the above example. It is an office building where 80% of gross floor area will be occupied by tenants. Leasable area consists of open spaces where technical flooring, ceiling, lighting and HVAC systems as well as main partition walls will be totally installed by the owner.

Future tenants will receive their offices ready to use (in exception of the floor finishing). However they can add partition walls to customize the open spaces layout to their specific needs (as well as, of course, furniture).

The question is: can we choose between New Construction and Core & Shell or is the use of any of these systems mandatory (and, of course, which one)?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Pedro, it sounds more like an NC project than a CS project, based on how finished the interior spaces will be.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Jun 25 2015
LEEDuser Member
717 Thumbs Up

LEED CI

Our client is going to lease the whole building (which is being renovated right now) and he is considering LEED certification for his office. He will be responsible for fit-out preparation. Can an office which occupies the whole building apply for LEED CI certification?

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Jul 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 1108 Thumbs Up

If the project scope totals 40% or more of the building gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.), then LEED for Commercial Interiors is not the appropriate choice for this project, and certification should be pursued under one of the BD+C whole building rating systems (Rating System Selection Guidance, page 8).

If you are considering using LEED v2009, please review the 40/60 rule of thumb on page 7 of the LEED Rating System Selection Guidance (http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs6667.pdf) for detailed guidance on selecting the most appropriate rating system for your project.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Jul 10 2015 LEEDuser Member 717 Thumbs Up

We wanted to use LEED 2009 for Commercial Interiors because our client doesn't own the building so he won't be responsible for its renovation. He will only lease it and that means that he will have control over fitout works.
I was checking LEED Rating Secelction Guidance and it's still not entirely clear. According to section "Additional Aplications and Guidance" on page 8 it seems that we could use LEED CI because the client leases more than 90% of the building but he is not the entity that will conduct major renovation of the core and shell building. Please let me know if my interpretation is wrong.
If in this case LEED CI is not appplicable it seems to me that the clients are penalized only because they lease a whole building and they can't use any type of certification at this moment. They can't use LEED NC because they don't own the building and they can't use LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. because this system is for existing buildings (they would have to wait at least one year).

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Charalampos Giannikopoulos Senior Sustainability Consultant, DCarbon Jul 13 2015 LEEDuser Member 1108 Thumbs Up

I have had a similar case and we were instructed by the USGBC customer service to use LEED NC. However, since your client will only have control over fit-out works and lease their space, I suggest that you contact directly the USGBC customer service describing the situation and asking for instructions in order to confirm the use of LEED ID+C.

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Adamantia Zisopoulou Architect
May 05 2015
Guest
17 Thumbs Up

10 existing villas project

Project Location: Greece

My project is an existing sea resort complex which consists of 10 villas with kitchens. Which LEED rating system can I use? Do you believe that is better to be certified all the area or one villa?

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Nadav Malin USGBC LEED Faculty, President, BuildingGreen, Inc. Aug 13 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Hi Adamatia,

I think that LEED for Homes is your only option; which means that you'll be certifying each villa under LEED, though you should be able to group them to reduce redundancies. You might want to contact Energo Consultants in Milan and Belgrade; I believe they have Energy Raters on staff who can help you through this process.

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Cynthia Kaplan Principal cmk LEED
Apr 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
149 Thumbs Up

New Bus Depot: LEED BD+C or C+S?

Project Location: United States

My project is the new construction of a 3,000 s.f. bus depot in a small city. Part of the space will be leased to a retailer at a later date, most likely a convenience store or coffee shop. Since we can't include the water and power usage without knowing what retailer will lease the space, it seems that registering under C+S would make the most sense? I would welcome any input.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Cynthia, what percentage of the total SF is for the retail space?

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Melissa Merryweather Director Green Consult-Asia
Apr 23 2015
LEEDuser Member
3101 Thumbs Up

LEED CI or not?

GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). staff have just informed a colleague that his project can be certified CI. It is a resort, and the owner wants to renovate just the interior spaces of several buildings in the resort in single phases. They are owner, not separate lessor of the space. CI used to be strictly for lessors so that owners couldn't just choose parts of a building to renovate and avoid a whole-building certification. Has this changed? Thanks for advice.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Apr 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

Melissa, we recently certified a project which consisted of part of a building which was occupied by the owner. The building consisted of 2 floors and the owner was occupying one floor, the other floor was rented out to a tenant. I think the scope of works is what really counts. What GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). wants to avoid is that you are doing a full renovation but you only take into account the interior part and you exlcude the rest of the works.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Apr 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

that's interesting--so the owner had built the building and then completed a fit out on one floor for themselves and GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). didn't require the whole building to be certified as LEED CS? You could ignore the rest of the building and just certify the CI space that the owner occupied? I've been told before that that was impossible--by GBCI.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Apr 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

That is correct, but ... The building had been build previously under a separate contract and the inside was left unfinished. A year later, they started a separate project on the second floor of this building. Key here is the clear separation between the construction of the building (different contract, different time) and the CI project.

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Fabio Frescia PM, LEED AP, Arcadia (Thailand) Company Limited Apr 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 120 Thumbs Up

Hi everyone. Thanks Melissa to post this for me. So can I use CI for my project or not? GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). said I can certify each phase separately.

Thanks.

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Apr 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

So in the case of a building that is already fitted out, such as Fabio's resort client, if its enough of a renovation that it takes in major systems and external works and more than 50% of the space, its NC, if it is kept to internal works without affecting major building systems its CI, regardless of ownership of the spec, and if an existing space is less than 50% fitted out it would need be a LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. project. I'm very glad to have that clarified since LEED literature did not seem to support this definition of CI when I last checked more than a year ago. Thanks so much Emmanuel.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Apr 24 2015 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

I think that summary is correct, Melissa. For the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. I would add that "not disturbing normal operations" would be part of the evaluation criteria when assessing the scope of works.

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Fabio Frescia PM, LEED AP, Arcadia (Thailand) Company Limited Apr 25 2015 LEEDuser Member 120 Thumbs Up

If you're interested this is the answer form GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).:
Since the majority of the work occurring does not involve any site work and involves very limited construction to the façades or central mechanical or plumbing systems, but does include all the FF&E planned for the interior spaces that are the focus of each phase of work, LEED-CI v2009 would probably be the most appropriate rating system to address the design & construction work being done at the resort. LEED-CI is not only for use by tenants who rent. It is available to any owned or leased space regardless of use. In order to achieve certification for at least portions of the resort as soon as possible you could register each phase of your project as a separate LEED-CI project (before the October 31, 2016 v2009 registration deadline). Then as each phase is completed upload the documents into LEED Online and submit that phase (i.e. LEED-CI project) for review. Phases could be submitted and potentially certified shortly after construction was completed versus waiting until all phases of the work are complete and submitting the whole site for a single LEED-NC certification. Please note that the present deadline (a.k.a. ‘sunset date’) for submitting LEED v2009 projects for (at least) their initial round of review is June 2021, but that is quite a while after the last phase of construction (in 2018, if we understand correctly) in your project’s present schedule of work. Please also note that for work of each phase that is distributed throughout multiple structures in various parts of the resort, the resort would first have to qualify for LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10203 (see below) to consider the entire resort ‘one building’, and then also meet conditions (a-f) on pages on 19-20 of the LEED v2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance (see below) to certify only one or more portions of a single, owner-occupied building as one LEED-CI project.

If you or the owner are also interested in demonstrating that the ongoing operations and maintenance of the resort are already exemplary and meet LEED requirements you can simultaneously register & seek certification under the LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. v2009 rating system. Please keep in mind that for Energy and Atmosphere Prerequisite 2 (EAp2) and Credit 1 (EAc1) there is a minimum performance period requirement of 1 year. You could potentially meet this requirement sooner by checking to see if you have historical energy use data on the project for the last 9 months that meets the prerequisite & credit requirements. You could then utilize the next 3 months (or so) for the balance of the EAp2/c1 minimum performance period and for the minimum required performance period for all other prerequisites and credits. It is also required that the project meet Minimum Program Requirements including MPR 5 which deals with occupancy (see the LEED v2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance cited below). Using the LEED EBOM v2009 rating system you could reference LEED Interpretation (LI) #10203 and treat the entire resort as an individual building project if it meets all the eligibility criteria listed in the LI.

I am including links below to some resources that will help you with the 2 discussed LEED routes above. I have also added a few other links that are good reference should you feel you want to try another LEED certification route.

· LEED Credit Library which allows you to select requirements by rating system - http://www.usgbc.org/credits

· LEED Interpretation 10203 allowing resorts to treat multiple buildings as a single building for LEED purposes as long as certain criteria are met- http://www.usgbc.org/leed-interpretations?keys=10203

· v2009 LEED MPR - http://www.usgbc.org/credits/commercial-interiors/v2009/minimum-program-...

· LEED v2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance http://www.usgbc.org/sites/default/files/Docs10131.pdf

· Campus Guidance document - http://www.usgbc.org/resources/campus-guidance

· Rating System Selection Guide - http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/General/Docs6667.pdf

· Certification Fee Guide - http://www.usgbc.org/cert-guide/fees

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Sara Greenwood Green Building Consultant Cadmus Group
Apr 14 2015
LEEDuser Member
187 Thumbs Up

Does CI fit into BD+C?

Project Location: United States

Hello, I am developing TI Guidelines for unfinished retail space in a building pursuing BD+Cv2009. Can the future tenant pursue CI?

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 7858 Thumbs Up

Hi Sara,
If you mean a C&S project, then yes the tenant can pursue a CI for their tenant improvement. If you mean a NC project, then no. The tenant requirements are necessary for the whole building to get the certification. The good news is that the future tenant will be part of the building that got certified so they will share in it.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist, HGA Apr 14 2015 LEEDuser Member 2090 Thumbs Up

Michelle, I don't know if I agree. The LI that requires the tenant guidelines for non-CS projects (LI 10102) only notes that the guidelines are required and that the base buildingThe base building includes elements such as the structure, envelope, and building-level mechanical systems, such as central HVAC, etc. cannot achieve any ID point for developing the guideline. It specifically notes that the tenant is not bound by the owner's letter of commitment/required to meet the same requirements. While the guidelines are required for the non-CS base building, they are not something that the tenants are required to actually follow.

As such, it would appear to me that tenants could achieve CI (or CI-Retail in this case) in the future provided that they could demonstrate compliance with all of the prerequisites and MPR requirements. Given that the tenant guidelines are supposed to specifically speak to how tenants could achieve CI certification, it just seems counter-intuitive to me that USGBC would not allow those spaces to certify.

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Michelle Rosenberger Partner, ArchEcology, LLC Apr 15 2015 LEEDuser Member 7858 Thumbs Up

Hi Kristina,
You have a good point. We've been doing these so long that despite at least two dozen projects that use tenant guidelines both C&S and NC, I don't remember closely examining this LI. So thanks for the pointer, but I admit I'm more confused now that I've read it closely.

Overall, I think you are right and whether the project is NC or C&S, the tenant build out is able to go for LEED-CI if they so desire. It makes a little less sense to me with an NC project but that appears to be the case. So I retract my statement above.

However, I do not understand at all the idea that a tenant build out is different than an owner build out. Or that a tenant is not required to follow the guidelines. We have always generated our guidelines based on the idea that the whole building cannot claim credit for something that the whole building is not doing. So we have always believed that a tenant is required to fulfill the same obligations that the Owner indicates will be fulfilled by the build out, whoever is performing it ultimately.

Thanks for the correction. I learn something new that I thought I knew in LEED every day.

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Maria Glädt White Arkitekter AB
Apr 09 2015
LEEDuser Member
120 Thumbs Up

Tricky project - NC, C&S or EBOM?

Project Location: Sweden

Hi

We have a eight storey office building that will undergo a larger Core and Shell refurbishment; windows will be changed, the building is u-shaped and the "interior courtyard will be enclosed by glasing - and turned into a wintergarden, inside all HVAC and electrical fittings will be replaced. 1,5 floors will be exluded regarding HVAC and electrical, in these untouched floors the tenants will remain.
One floor will be used as an evacuation plan while the rest of the building is being refurbished.
On the top 2,5 floors the tenant is known and is working with his own tenant fitout. It is not certain whether the fitout will be a part of the construction of the Core and Shell project or if it will be a seperate contract.
Our first thought was that it should be a C&S, but now I'm wondering if NC would be more suitable? Or should it be a EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.? But in any case how do we handle the floors where nothing is done? Could they be excluded? The developer intends to renovate these areas as well, but they don't know when that is going to happen, could be in two, five or three years, and once renovated they will meet at least the same standards as today.

Would be grateful for all advise on this matter!
Best Regards

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Ulrika, given the extent of the project my gut feeling is that NC is the best fit. One benefit of NC here is that it provides a centralized, whole-building approach for the LEED administration. However, I can see a case for CS as well.

EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. is a very different system focused on operations. I would encourage you to do that, but it feels less your focus right now with all the construction going on.

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Fabio Frescia PM, LEED AP Arcadia (Thailand) Company Limited
Apr 01 2015
LEEDuser Member
120 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or EBOM ?

Hi,

We just got a project here in Thailand that just started, where our client would like to achieve a LEED certification.

It's an existing resort and they want to renovate it.

When I say renovate that means: all new layout, new HVAC systems (except they have bought a new water chilled system, that feeds all resort, 2 years ago, no need to replace it), new finishing, new lighting system, new furniture. Maintain the external walls and maybe renovate the façade.

It's an area of total 30,000 m2 and 17,500 m2 (that include 1,500 m2 of roads) will be renovated in 4 different phases, one phase per year, to be completed by 2018.

Does the project fall into NC or EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.?

Since it's a 4 phases project (Design is from March to May/ Construction is from June to September of each year, considered low season period) do I have consider this as a LEED Campus?

Please give me some advices.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

Hello Fabio,

The rating system selection guidance, found at: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-2009-rating-system-selection-guidance
provides a definition of "major renovation". Typically the extent and nature of the work is such that the primary function space cannot be used for its intended purpose while the work is in progress and where a new certificate of occupancy is required before the work area can be reoccupied.

From your description, I believe your project to be a Major Renovation, thus falling into the LEED for New Construction rating systems.

LEED Campus does not apply to phasing of a project rather it applies to scopes that include multiple projects on a shared site under the control of a single entity. Please note that projects that qualify for LEED Campus are not required to pursue this path.

Hope this helps.
Good Luck!

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Fabio Frescia PM, LEED AP, Arcadia (Thailand) Company Limited Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Member 120 Thumbs Up

Dear David,

Thank you very much for your reply. It was really helpful. So even if they are maintaining the core of the building and they have recently replaced the air chilled system with water chilled one, but since they will have to shut the building for the renovation and eventually issue a certificate of occupancy, then it falls under NC and Major Renovation.
Correct?

Thanks again!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

if the building will be shut for the renovation, and a certificate of occupancy is needed after the work is complete, then yes it would definately be a LEED for New Construction project.

For official guidance i would recommend contacting USGBC.
http://www.usgbc.org/contactus

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Adi Negara, LEED AP BD+C Green Building Facilitator PT. Indonesia Environment Consultant
Mar 10 2015
LEEDuser Member
958 Thumbs Up

Categorizing a LEED project

Project Location: Indonesia

Hello all,
I have a difficulty in determining the appropriate LEED rating system for a project, and I hope that you all can tell me what rating system is best suited to the project:

The project owner (say Company X), is planning to set an entirely new business (factory) in our country, but they haven't got the experience. On the other hand, Company Y, who runs the business in question, needed a new factory location, but don't have the fund. So Company X agreed to provide new location for Company Y, in exchange that they will help Company X in setting up the business, so it really is a win-win situation.

The plan is that the owner will build two buildings (each consists of factory and office space) in 2 phases. First is to construct building "A" designated for Company Y to operate, and in the next phase, building "B" will be built for Company X (owner). Both will have the same building design and floor area size.

So what is the appropriate LEED rating system for registering this project in the LEED online? Do we need to register it in two different NC projects or one under campus project? Does the first phase can be registered in NC or have to be in CS, since Company Y is not the owner and don't have the authority. And how about the certification fees for this?
Please share your opinion on this. Thanks.

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Adi Negara, LEED AP BD+C Green Building Facilitator, PT. Indonesia Environment Consultant Mar 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 958 Thumbs Up

There's a change in the plan, Building A and B will be constructed simultaneously, so what's the better rating system to be used, the Campus Approach or the Group Approach?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Apr 02 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

From your description I believe the Campus approach to be the best way to streamline the certification.

I would also guess that LEED NC is the most applicable rating system to use for each building.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K
Mar 06 2015
LEEDuser Member
717 Thumbs Up

Eligibility for LEED - existing building structure

Project Location: Poland

Our client would like to certify a building that had its structural components and facade built a few years ago. The building however was never finished, there are no HVAC instalation and there are no interior finishes. Now they want to finish the building which means that there will be some internal works and instalation of HVAC systems. The envelope of the building won't be changed. Is this building eligible for LEED CS certification? Can we define the building as major renovation even though it was never used and there won't be any changes made to the building envelope?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

You could pursue CS if you don't build out the interior during this next phase.

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 717 Thumbs Up

Thank you for your reply. So do you think we can define this building as "major renovation" eventhough we are not going to change anything in the building envelope?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

since the building was never complete it would not meet the definition of "major renovation".

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Agata Mozer GO4IT SP Z OO SP K Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 717 Thumbs Up

Then should it be defined as a new building? The problem is that it was constructed a few years ago by a different company and I'm afraid that there would be problems with documenting the Prerequsite (SSp1) connected to construction activities which probably were not conducted according to LEED requirements.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

you are correct, documenting previous activities from different companies is difficult and in most cases impossible. most notably the documentation of an ESCAn Erosion and Sedimentation Control (ESC) plan is a collection of measures designed to reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation and airborne dust generation plan (SSp1) and the OPROwner's project requirements (OPR) is a written document that details the ideas, concepts, and criteria that are determined by the owner to be important to the success of the project./BODBasis of design (BOD) includes design information necessary to accomplish the owner's project requirements, including system descriptions, indoor environmental quality criteria, design assumptions, and references to applicable codes, standards, regulations, and guidelines. review of EAp1.

The best plan may be to contact the USGBC and see if you could "reset" this project prior to moving forward.

It would be benificial to all if you could post the USGBC response on this forum.

Good Luck!

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Mar 06 2015 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

For what its worth, we had a similar situation and we decided to take the slow train: finish the building, wait 18 months and certify under LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. The strategy worked, and knowing we were going to certify under LEED EBOM really helped focus the remaining construction work so that we could maximise the outcome of the future certification.

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Isolda Strom Royal HaskoningDHV
Mar 02 2015
LEEDuser Member
72 Thumbs Up

Is C&S allowed if you are eligible for NC?

Project Location: Netherlands

We are in the very early stages of a project that is considering LEED certification. Demarcation is still unclear, but it the client is interested in all options. If a project has control over (a substantial part of) interior/ finishes, is it still permitted to pursue C&S certification instead of NC? Or must a project in that case certify under NC?

Many thanks!

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Mar 02 2015 Guest 1913 Thumbs Up

Isolda,

CS versus NC certification is based mainly on the scope of work for the Owner/Developer. If the majority of the scope of work will be controlled by your client, then it is very likely that NC certification will be required. There are two posted rules about CS certification, one which involves a 50% rule and another that involves a 40%/60% rule - both say the same thing: If the Owner/Developer has control over the build-out for 50%, 60%, or more of the project, then the project cannot certify under Core and Shell. The LEED Reference Guide for BD+C outlines these thresholds. Hope this helps!

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Isolda Strom Royal HaskoningDHV Mar 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 72 Thumbs Up

Lauren,
Very helpful, thank you!

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Joel Cesare Sustainable Building Advisor City of Santa Monica
Feb 11 2015
LEEDuser Member
53 Thumbs Up

Can an existing tenant pursue LEED O+M?

A company that occupies an entire floor of an existing building has been in operation in this building over 2 years. They asked if they could get LEED Certification for their office. Is is possible to achieve an O+M certification for a tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.?

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 11 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

O+M is an entire building rating system, tenant spaces are not eligible.

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Devanand Ragbir Mechanical Engineer Devserv Ltd
Feb 05 2015
LEEDuser Member
124 Thumbs Up

Arrival of tenants in a LEED CS building

Our CS building is scheduled for commissioning end of August. Can tenants start outfitting their spaces before this date which will enable their employees to work from September. If this is possible, are their any limitation with respect to tenants occupancy before the building is complete.
Many Thanks

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 05 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

While not preferred, tenants can start outfitting their space before the commissioning occurs. If the tenant buildouts are under seperate contracts there are no limitation with respect to tenant occupancy before the building is complete. If the tenant buildouts are under the same contract as the Core & Shell work, and the tenant buildout work exceeds 50% of the total building floor area, then LEED for New Construction would need to be pursued.

hope this helps.

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Stella Stella
Feb 02 2015
Guest
595 Thumbs Up

Which LEED Rating system?

Hi, we are working on a project with integrated development, which houses a community park and a building with mixed use (commercial ,indoor & outdoor sports, library) in the same site. Which rating system should I use? Thanks.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 05 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

sounds like LEED NC. if there are multiple buildings you may be able to register a master site and group certify them.

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COWI AS
Jan 30 2015
LEEDuser Member
1098 Thumbs Up

Is this project a CS project?

We are wondering if our building can be certified with CS: The building is a renovation project in which a developer is fundamentally refurbishing the building base systems and building shellThe exterior walls, roof, and lowest floor of a building, which serve to separate and protect the interior from the elements (precipitation, sunlight, wind, temperature variations)..
The building is mainly office building, a small part appr. 20% is occupied by a school.
The developer will not occupy a single sf in this building.
The fit-out will be done as tennants come in (for each tennant space at a time). The control over fit-out remains with the tennant and the developer builds the fit-out with his contractor according to tennant specs.
Would consider the project Core&Shell project? Or is a NC project since one contractor is performing Core, Shell and fit-out?
Thanks!

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

20% occupied once renovation is done sounds like C&S to me. Doesn't matter if contractor is performing both C&S and tenant fit-out work.

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COWI AS Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Member 1098 Thumbs Up

Hi David,
thanks a lot for your reply.
I might have expressed myself poorly, the building is not 20% occupied once renovated, but 20% is occupied by a school, and the rest will be offices. The building will probably be at least 50% occupied once renovated. Is there any applicable rule regarding choosing C&S VS NC on the percentage of occupation once built?
Thanks

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Feb 03 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

Hello Juliane,
In that case you could choose NC. C&S is still applicable if the tenant fit-out is performed through a seperate contract, regardless if it is the same contractor.

The 40/60 rule of the Rating System Selection Guidance document outlines that more than rating system may apply. In cases as such project teams can choose which rating.

There is not an occupancy rule for NC or C&S, rather "how much will be built out during the certification" rule. Less than 50% built-out/occupied, i would choose C&S. More than 50% built-out/occupied, i would choose NC.

Hope this helps.

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Catherine Verdier Le Sommer Environnement
Jan 29 2015
Guest
49 Thumbs Up

BD+C Major Renovation or O+M Existing Buildings

Project Location: France

Hello,

The project I am working on is an existing office building, that will undergo renovation works and will have its entrance hall extended (the extension will be a little more than 1,000 sf).
The renovation works will include (amongst other things) the addition of renewable energy sources, replacement of lighting fixtures, enhancement of the ventilation network, and partial replacement of thermal insulation and roof watertightness.
Internal finishes will not be replaced, and the building will be occupied during the works.

Would BD+C Major Renovation or O+M Existing Buildings be more appropriate in this case?

Thanks in advance for your help.

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David Hubka Director - Operations, Transwestern Sustainability Services Jan 29 2015 LEEDuser Expert 2933 Thumbs Up

Hi Catherine,

To be considered a major renovation the extent and nature of the work is such that primary function space cannot be used for its intended purpose while the work is in progress and where a new certificate of occupancy is required before the work area can be reoccupied.

The work you describe seems to border on "major renovation" however USGBC may require you to pursue EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. since the building will remain occupied during the renovation.

When you register the project on LEED Online you are asked a series of questions to determine the appropriate rating system. If one rating system cannot be clearly defined you will be provided with USGBC customer support to help in your selection process.

Hope this helps!

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Carlos Leignadier
Jan 21 2015
Guest
23 Thumbs Up

What Rating System to use

Hi,
We are currently working on certifying a mall with the Core and Shell V2009 rating system. Inside this mall a supermarket will be located, and the client is asking if the supermarket can be certified, what rating system can I use in order to evaluate the feasibility of certifying the supermarket.
Thanks

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Jan 21 2015 Guest 1913 Thumbs Up

Carlos,

I would like into LEED-CI for Retail. This would likely be your best bet. Good luck!

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COWI AS
Jan 20 2015
LEEDuser Member
1098 Thumbs Up

LEED Core&Shell?

Hi!
Our building is a renovation project in which the developer does a total refurbishment of building base systems and building shellThe exterior walls, roof, and lowest floor of a building, which serve to separate and protect the interior from the elements (precipitation, sunlight, wind, temperature variations)..
The building is mainly office building, a small part appr. 20% is occupied by a school.
The developer will not occupy a single sf in this building.
The fit-out will be done as tennants come in (for each tennant space at a time). The control over fit-out remains with the tennant and the developer builds the fit-out with his contractor according to tennant specs.
I am not sure weather it is core&shell or not and I might be in a grey zone, from what i understand from the comments in this forum.
So my first question is if you would consider the project Core&Shell.

We asked for a clarification of another topic on this project (CIRCredit Interpretation Ruling. Used by design team members experiencing difficulties in the application of a LEED prerequisite or credit to a project. Typically, difficulties arise when specific issues are not directly addressed by LEED information/guide) and the answer also included a comment on the core &shell. "Core and Shell is the appropriate rating system to use if more than 40% of the gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.) is incomplete at the time of certification." We were asked to make sure weather Core &Shell is the right system. I have not seen this statement before and it does not make sense for me in this connection.
My second question is if you have seen in before and can make sense out of it in connection with Core&shell?

Thanks a lot in advance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Juliane, it sounds like a CS project to me. The 40% language you were quoted is in the rating system selection guidance posted at the top of this page. It refers to the 40%–60% rule, in which the project use for that proportion of the project should roughly govern rating system selection. There is some gray area within that percentage.

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Jan 07 2015
Guest
642 Thumbs Up

Best way to document a building with multiple phases

Hello

I am currently working on a mixed-use campus project. This project will only be 1 building, however construction will be done in two phases. All the design work has already been completed. A majority of hte construction will be completed in one phase. The remained of the construction will be completed about 1 year after this.

What is the best way to handle this?

Would I still document it under the normal New Construction process with a design and construction phase submission? If so, I am worried about sitting on material/product submittals/info (MRc4,MRc5,IEQc4.1-44) for a year while we wait for phase 2 to be completed.

Has anyone encountered this before?

Thanks

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Lauren Wallace LEED Project Reviewer, LEED AP BD+C, Senior LEED Specialist, Certifications Department Manager, Epsten Group, Inc. Jan 07 2015 Guest 1913 Thumbs Up

Hi, Mike!

Most projects I have seen with multiple phases submit as a Standard Preliminary Review with the D+C phases combined once the project is complete. However, you are also able to submit for the Design phase, since this portion is complete, and then wait until Phase 2 construction is complete to submit for the Construction Preliminary Review. Some projects wait years to resubmit between the two phases. Which way you choose to go may depend on your contract for the project and/or timeline. Another option is to reach out to GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). through their help link online and get in touch with someone there so you can hash out more specifics. Good luck!

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability, Solomon Cordwell Buenz Jan 07 2015 Guest 642 Thumbs Up

I feared that this would be the answer. I have some concerns about sitting on construction info for a year after completion. If we need to elaborate or provide additional content due to LEED reviewer comment(s), it would be tough to back-track.

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Max Speigle
Jan 02 2015
Guest
111 Thumbs Up

Dance School rating system: EB O+M School or not?

Hi All,
A dance school, one building- 90,000 SF is looking to get certified.
I am unsure if it will be EB O+M, or EB O+M Schools.
It is not k-12 and not a university.
It is a nonprofit dance school- it does collaborate with a college to give a Bachelor of Arts Degree.

I have asked USGBCI through this email 2 weeks ago: certinfo@gbci.org. I am waiting for a response. Any feedback is appreciated.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Max, the Schools rating systems typically apply to K-12 schools. Unless there is a reason you really want to go with Schools, I would say it's not that.

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MKK LEED
Dec 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
138 Thumbs Up

Core Learning Space implies use School LEED requirements?

Project Location: Colombia

Hi All,

I’m working in a LEED project that will be a building for the training of teachers, It is planned to have conferences, meetings and there will be ‘’laboratories’’ that is more a kind of rooms for different areas, for example: Body lab is just a room for dance, Bricolaje room is an open space with tables for make whatever thing (write, assemble things, use laptops, etc), TV room will have cameras, computers and televisions, a reading room, there will be a library, an auditorium and administrative offices, etc.

Teachers will be able to choose any course and assist to that class in some specific schedules. In the other hand there will be conferences in the auditorium.

I’m not sure if the building classified as a ’’Core Learning Space – Other Space’’ or as ‘’Public Assembly – Other Assembly’’. But mi question is if I consider the project as a ’’Core Learning Space – Other Space’’ do I have to use the LEED requirements for ‘’Schools’’?

Thank you very much

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

MKK, I'm a little confused about your question. Are you looking at this in terms of rating system selection, or simply how to classify a space on the LEED project information forms?

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Pushkala R Environmental Architect
Dec 05 2014
Guest
25 Thumbs Up

Choosing between LEED CS and EB for commercial building in India

Project Location: India

HI,
I am trying to apply for LEED certification as per LEED v3 2009 in India. My project profile is as follows:
1. It an existing building that has been in use for over a decade.

2. It underwent an HVAC retrofit 2 years back

3. The entire building is leased out to multiple tenants

Ideally, we would have to apply for LEED: Existing buildings O&M. But considering the entire building has been leased out to tenants, the owner does not have control over its O&M of the fitouts. Moreover, all the tenants have not connected to the new HVAC system. I wish to know if I can apply for LEED: Core and Shell under major renovations.

R Pushkala
India

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Pushkala, I think your only option is EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems., since there is no major work going on that would call for a D+C system. Possibly you could do CI as any spaces are renovated.

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Srimannarayana NCVK ESD Consultant
Nov 13 2014
Guest
424 Thumbs Up

LEED EBOM

Project Location: United Arab Emirates

Hi,

We are working on a project in Dubai.
The building is 55% office and 45% hotel.
There is no floor level metering and the building has only one electricity meter.

I would like to know the challenges that we will be facing to acheive the required enegry star rating.
May i know your views please.

Thanks
Sriman

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Dec 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 812 Thumbs Up

Can you verify which rating system and version you are considering?

My suggestion is to start using ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager starting with an office facility and then entering a separate space type of hotel and see what happens assuming you can use Case 1.

Theoretically the office space type should be eligible for facilities that are at least 50% office. However, in practice this arrangement may not be intended for buildings where 45% of the facility is a hotel, and likely has a higher EUI than the office portion of the building.

If the results don't make sense, USGBC may be able to help you develop a Case 2 calculation.

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Emily Wang SCB
Nov 06 2014
Guest
34 Thumbs Up

Existing Dining Facility Building v3 rating system

Project Location: United States

I'm working on an existing Dining facility which has a significant amount of interior renovations and a small amount of NC, and exterior. The current building is not being used, nor being provided with any heating or cooling.

A large portion of the 20K area will be Food service preparation as well as the dining seating area. The industrial grade kitchen equipment being brought into the project requires a fair amount of exhaust and cooling. This is a concern I have. The other concern is bringing in future heating, cooling, and ventilation.

What is the best option for LEED pursuit if we are under v3?

EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.? CI? Any insight? Would we be exempt from calculation of load from the requiremenst for kitchen exhaust etc?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
Emily

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David Eldridge Project Manager, Grumman/Butkus Associates Dec 07 2014 LEEDuser Member 812 Thumbs Up

It sounds like the project would qualify as an NC project due to the extent of renovations and new construction, however it sounds like you are unsure if the project will meet the minimum energy prerequisite due to the intensity of the kitchen equipment? Your engineer may be able to offer some potential strategies to reach the minimum energy performance, even for a dining facility. CI may be a viable path as well depending on the magnitude of the envelope modifications and HVAC renovations not related to the "process" portion of the building, and knowing that it is discouraged for owner occupied buildings to use CI where there aren't any tenants. To investigate CI, the first step might be to run through the MPRs and Prerequisites to see how your project matches up. If you determine that neither NC or CI will work, you may consider other alternatives. Green Globes may be an option for you, since that rating system doesn't have prerequisites and might offer a better fit for this type of facility.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner Green Living Projects s.l.
Nov 05 2014
LEEDuser Member
3858 Thumbs Up

Core and Shell for Residential project

Project Location: Spain

A developer certifies a 10 story residential building using the LEED Core and Shell rating system. He then sells the residential appartments to individual buyers, the building will no longer one entity. As such it would loose its C&S certification. Is that correct?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Emmanuel, the building doesn't lose the CS certification, no. You can't really lose a D+C certification—it just becomes less relevant over time unless renewed.

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Toni Herena Montull Project Engineer Aiguasol
Oct 15 2014
Guest
93 Thumbs Up

CS 2009 or CS v4

Project Location: Spain

Hi,
this may be a silly question, but I do not know if there is any special requirement o detail that force me to start a project following CS v4 instead CS 2009. Is CS 2009 obsolete? I know it is recommended to start as soon as possible with CS v4, but is there a critical reason for it?

We have a client that thought in CS 2009 and we do not know if, when CS v4 is already working, if it is possible to start the registration with CS2009.

Thank you in advance and sunny regards.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Nov 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

Toni, you can choose to use either Version 2009 or Version 4 until October 2016. Project registered after October 2016 MUST be Version 4, but for now you can choose either. There are arguments in favour of both versions, it mainly depends on the intentions and commitment of the owner.

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Joel Cesare Sustainable Building Advisor, City of Santa Monica Feb 11 2015 LEEDuser Member 53 Thumbs Up

Emmanuel, are there arguments for v2009 besides easier/less expensive?

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Feb 12 2015 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

Joel, I don´t think so. V4 makes a lot more sense to me and it puts LEED where it should be, challenging teams to make a project more efficient and sustainable. We are currently doing projects and without doing anything special we usually end up with LEED Silver. It all depends on the countries of couse, but in general in Europe and the US I would say that is the case.

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Erika Duran Sustainability Consultant Dagher Engineering
Sep 22 2014
LEEDuser Member
1842 Thumbs Up

How do I know if my project is in a LEED ND community

Project Location: United States

Is there are a resource out there that lets you know if your building is located in a LEED ND property? I tried GBIG but doesn't seem to have ND projects in their database.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Erika, check GBIG again—I think it does have ND now. Sorry for slow response.

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Timothy Schmitt Studio 222 Architects
Sep 11 2014
LEEDuser Member
42 Thumbs Up

NC 2009 or v4 Multifamily Midrise

Hi,
I'm working on a mid-rise residential development that includes residential units & parking. There are two adjoined buildings. Six floors above grade w/ one below (lower level & 1st Floor are primarily parking w/ residential units on Floors 2 thru 6). What are the advantages/disadvantages of going w/ either NC 2009 or v4 Multifamily Midrise? What would you recommend?

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Asa Foss LEED for Homes Techincal Development, US Green Building Council Sep 12 2014 LEEDuser Expert 847 Thumbs Up

Hi Steve,

Great questions. Quick FYI - when looking at rating system selection, we don't count parking decks.

You have 3 options for this project: NC 2009, Midrise v4, or Midrise v2010.

USGBC recommends that all projects start using v4 as early as possible, since we've made quite a few improvements throughout the v4 rating systems. That being said, regardless of the version, we recommend Midrise over NC for this multifamily project because it's a more appropriate rating system. It was written specifically for this project type, whereas NC is more general since it is applicable across the gamut of commercial buildings.

As an architect, you will benefit from the onsite verification process required in Midrise. For example, all the energy efficiency specs/details that you develop will be verified to be installed properly on site by an energy expert. In addition, the onsite verification process means there is less documentation required, and nothing is required to be uploaded to LEED Online.

If you have any specific questions, I'd be happy to answer them.
-Asa

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Carlos Echeverria Architect, Studio Domus Sep 19 2014 LEEDuser Member 842 Thumbs Up

Asa,

I have a very similar situation to Timothy's, except my project is located outside the US - in Guatemala. We've had a very difficult time with LEED for Homes in the past because it doesn't seem to be a very international-friendly rating system, so we would rather stick with NC or CS 2009.

My questions are:

1. How are the occupiable above-grade stories defined for LEED? Our project will have 4 occupiable stories, but the upper two will belong to the same apartment units (two-story apartments). I'm asking this because we are on the borderline of being allowed to use NC.

2. Could we use CS for a midrise residential building if the scope will not include a complete interior fit-out? Things such as furniture, lamps, and kitchen equipment will probably not be provided by the developer.

3. Given that the project is outside the US, do you agree that it would be better to use NC/CS than Midrise v4? What do you think our limitations would be?

Thanks for your help!

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Melissa Merryweather Director, Green Consult-Asia Sep 20 2014 LEEDuser Member 3101 Thumbs Up

Alejandro,

Am afraid the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). did not agree to let me use LEED NC on a similar project I had in Khazakhstan. This scale of project is not appropriate for LEED CS--there are a few LEED CS residential projects but they have tend to be residential towers--almost all residential is either LEED for Homes, Midrise, or NC. Remember that we don't normally include furniture and lamps in any case for NC, you just need basic finishes and equipments like sanitary ware, AC, ventilation and basic ceiling/wall lighting. Regarding LEED for Homes: It was impossible for me to become certified as a LEED for Homes Reviewer, because you must track an existing project with a certified reviewer to complete your certification, something that I could not arrange to do outside the US. The requirements seem unnecessarily confusing. In my case we had to drop the project.

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Emmanuel Pauwels Owner, Green Living Projects s.l. Nov 05 2014 LEEDuser Member 3858 Thumbs Up

Alejandro, Melissa, We are starting with the certification of a major renovation of a residential building that has 10 floors. First of all, since this project is in Spain, I think Midrise would not be an option because it would require someone from the USA to come over. I would love to become a Green Rater myself, but due to the lack of projects under the LEED for Homes rating system it may a bit too early for that. Did you go ahead with your project Alejandro? If so, what Rating system did you decide to apply? Melissa, I am surprised to hear GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). did not let you use NC on a similar project. What was their argumentation? In our project I am evaluating NC agains CS. I am discussing with the developer, but it may be that they will offer the residential units without basic finishes such as interior finishes and water fixtures. Or to make it more complicated, they might offer some residential units including an interior fit-out and some residential units without such an interior fit-out. I am thinking of applying the 40/60 rule in that case. Interested in getting any feedback ...

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Pat Kirwan
Sep 10 2014
Guest
28 Thumbs Up

Rating System ?

Hi All,

Looking for some advise on the selection of a rating system. We have an existing building which will undergo a major renovation (just the concrete shell will remain prior to renovation). Once complete it will be a Core and Shell development with one or multiple tenancies (Office Usage on all floors and a restaurant on Ground Floors). Which system is most appropriate, Core & Shell or Major Renovation (V4). Thanks in Advance.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 27 2015 LEEDuser Moderator

Pat, it sounds like a CS project.

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ACE Bermuda
Aug 26 2014
Guest
27 Thumbs Up

LEED Dynamic Plaque--any thoughts and experiences to share?

Hi all,
I'm curious to know if anyone has had experiences with installing and maintaining the Dynamic Plaque. Empirical opinions on the ease, or difficulty, of use would be appreciated. Even speculative thoughts on potential cost saving (in time, equipment, etc) of this budding scheme would be helpful in determining whether this is something our team should be pursuing. To provide an inkling of context, our building had achieved certification in 2011 under v2009, and we're quickly coming to the crossroads of choosing between Dynamic Plaque and recertification under v2009 EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. Apologies if this is the wrong place to post this message.

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Barry Giles Founder & CEO, LEED Fellow, BREEAM Fellow, BuildingWise LLC Sep 02 2014 LEEDuser Expert 7623 Thumbs Up

Ace, How timely. This discussion is the talk of the town at the moment. In its current format and of todays’ date the Dynamic Plaque (DP) is being touted by the LEED management as ‘continuous re-certification’. The DP will pull five parameters from a buildings operations namely: Energy usage, Water usage, a yearly transportation survey, a yearly recycle survey and a ’human’ experience survey. As you will well know LEED EB re-certification covers all aspects of the building operations including purchasing, mercury content, building cleanliness, green cleaningGreen cleaning is the use of cleaning products and practices that have lower environmental impacts and more positive indoor air quality impacts than conventional products and practices., pest management, etc, etc….so based on looking at the two formats the DP is a far simpler methodology to recertify a building than by the original LEED EB method. As to cost, it is suggested that the DP will be much cheaper as far less data gathering will be needed and there will be no content for the LEED EB AP to undertake and therefore no LEED EB AP fees. (The DP is to be sold direct by the USGBC to the building owner/operator and with major control companies currently able to supply BMS content direct to the plaque the only possible work that the LEED EB AP could perform is the yearly transportation survey and a recycle survey.) Currently we are told that the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). will be ‘certifying’ the DP data yearly with the option to gain increased points and increased LEED rating status. The DP will then enable buildings to raise their current Silver to Gold (as examples) based on an almost automatic process. Currently sold by the USGBC as a $300/month with a three year contract this methodology will be rolled out to the USGBC membership at Greenbuild in New Orleans.

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Xavier Valladares Sustainability Consultant ECOstudio XV LTD
Aug 18 2014
Guest
52 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or Healthcare for an Oupatient Building with 24h ER

We have a client that is questioning which LEED versión to use. The Building is an Outpatient Building with 20 consulting rooms, offices and a 24 hour Emergency Facility.
We already told them that Healtcare does not apply as there would be no "in patients" on the building. We also noted that despite having some "beds" in the Emergency facility, the patients should not stay more tan 8h, as they would need to be transfered to a proper Hospital if that was the case.
Can you confirm BD+C New Construction would apply to this building type?
Many thanks,
Regards,
XV

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Susan Walter Specifications Director, Populous Aug 18 2014 LEEDuser Expert 20761 Thumbs Up

I'm 99% sure that NC would be your LEED program. You could choose to use HC but it is not required (and I would not recommend it). Let's talk outpatients.

In the US, we define outpatients as those patients staying 23 hours or less (Same day stay). Note that this doesn't define hours of operation. You said that the Emergency Department is 24 hours which I've taken to mean that the building is open that length of time. As long as they wouldn't keep a patient over 23 hours, then it should be in NC. If they house patients over 23 hours and the building is outside the US, then you are in a gray area. I'd call the GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). and get confirmation if this is the case.

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Mike Stopka Director of Sustainability Solomon Cordwell Buenz
Aug 12 2014
Guest
642 Thumbs Up

NC vs Core & Shell for Mixed Use Building

Working on a project that is:
151,971 SF - multi-family residential units (30%)
168,780 SF - retail/future occupant build out (33%)
185,870 SF - parking (37%)

In the past, we have used LEED NC for our mixed-use buildings. However the mixed-used buildings have never gone above 10% of the total area for future occupant build-out.

What are the advantages of using Core & Shell in this example?

I know for NC, any future tenant spaces need to be modeled as base line systems for the Energy Model. I fear that this will have drastic impacts on the project since 33% of it would not receive the benefits of energy efficient design.

Thanks

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Nicole Kimoto RIM Architects
Aug 06 2014
Guest
813 Thumbs Up

LEED CI or NC?

We have an existing industrial / historical building, and the client is proposing to construct new office spaces on the interior, minimizing the impact as much as possible on the exterior shell of the building. Could we target for CI? or NC (major renovation?). Or would we consider EB as an option as well? I don't have a clue.

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Jay Murray LEED Administrator Commercial Construction Consulting
Aug 04 2014
LEEDuser Member
230 Thumbs Up

Which LEED Rating Category?

Our client asked me about a project he is working on. This is a 3,600 square foot cafeteria that is being added onto a 175,000 square foot existing factory. The owner expressed that he wants to have the addition be LEED certified. I was unclear under which rating system that this would fall? There is really nothing being done to the factory itself, the only construction being performed is adding this new cafeteria on. Thanks, Jay.

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Jan Hesse Dipl.-Ing.(FH) | LEED AP ID+C ALPHA Immobilien Consulting GmbH
Jun 20 2014
Guest
242 Thumbs Up

Unleased areas in New Construction

We are working on an office project were 80% of the area is leased to a single tenant and 20% is uleased yet. The project will be certified under New Construction after a request of the main tenant.
Now it is unclear how we should handle the unleased area in the certification. Especially in the IEQ category we are worried about some credits.
For example IEQc6.1: Controllability of Systems - Lighting:
All occupants in the leased area will have task lighting (about 80% of all FTEs). To receive the credit at least 50% of the FTEs in the unleased area need task lighting, too. After it is unleased, we can not show compliance yet. Is a tenant lease agreement necessary there or is there any other general approach?
Thank you for your help!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Jan, these would be good questions to post to the specific LEEDuser forums on our site, such as IEQc6.1.

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Kristina Bach Sustainability Specialist, HGA Aug 27 2014 LEEDuser Member 2090 Thumbs Up

Jan - You probably also need to take a look at LEED InterpretationLEED Interpretations are official answers to technical inquiries about implementing LEED on a project. They help people understand how their projects can meet LEED requirements and provide clarity on existing options. LEED Interpretations are to be used by any project certifying under an applicable rating system. All project teams are required to adhere to all LEED Interpretations posted before their registration date. This also applies to other addenda. Adherence to rulings posted after a project registers is optional, but strongly encouraged. LEED Interpretations are published in a searchable database at usgbc.org. 10102 which sets additional requirements for NC projects which have incomplete spaces (I assume that 20% would not be complete). This is based on the assumption that your project registered after it was posted in November 2011.

Based on that interpretation, I would anticipate that you would need to include the requirements of IQEc6.1 in your LI-required Tenant Guidelines and Owner Commitment Letter, but I wouldn't think you would need to include the future occupants in your credit calculations of IEQc6.1. From my reading, it looks like the future tenants/space only need to be included in the performance calculations of WEp1/WEc3 and the EAp2/EAc1.

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COWI AS
Jun 19 2014
LEEDuser Member
1098 Thumbs Up

LEED NC or LEED schools

Hi! I have a 200.000 sf. university building with about 25 % of office space and 50% of learning space (open and closed spaces), the rest is circulation etc. I am a little insecure on which system to pick, NC or schools. It says that schools is mainly for K-12 schools, but it says, that it can also be used for higher education facilities.
What would you consider best?
Thanks,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Juliane, I think you could pick either system here. I personally think that LEED-NC is a better fit for a university building with mixed uses like this.

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Courtney Royal, LEED AP BD+C Sr. Sustainability Consultant Taitem Engineering
Jun 17 2014
LEEDuser Member
1769 Thumbs Up

LEED-EBOM for a shopping mall?

Does anyone have experience in getting a shopping mall LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. certified? I am just wondering how feasible it would be considering a mall has many smaller multitenant spaces. Anything insight or experience is welcome, thank you!

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 26 2014 LEEDuser Moderator

Courtney, I don't have experience on this, but I would acknowledge that anytime you have a lot of tenants, LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. can be more challenging. We have some helpful tips throughout this website on achieving certification in this case.

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Tom Kennedy Enhanse
May 27 2014
LEEDuser Member
238 Thumbs Up

One story condominium comlplex - tenant specification for LEED

Hello,
Myself and 3 others in the Cincinnati Regional Chapter did an intro to V4 event for chapter members tonight and fielded questions at the end.
A gentleman said he wants to generate a tenant design spec to all members of a condo association for an 18 unit single-story condo complex. Original construction was 1970's, so it is very due for upgrade. His impression is LEED Homes, when applied to renovation, pretty much forces going down to the "bones" and starting over. I recall hearing that Homes V4 was going to be more forgiving in this aspect. He wants to know what the best LEED approach might be. I don't believe V4 BD+C can fit due to single story residential nature. V4 has the "campus" and "group" approaches, might this be applicable here (since all condo residents will commit to a common specification)? Is it accurate that Homes V4 would be a better option than Homes V3? I do only commercial work, so I am not the right guy to field this questions - but I promised this gentleman I would ask and share what I found with the rest of the membership. Thank you.

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