PI Form 2 Project Summary Details

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Editor's Note: LEEDuser now has a forum dedicate to Project Information Form 2 where we also hope to add other resources, so we are phasing out this page. Please visit our PIf2 forum and post your questions and comments there!

Anyone know the difference between 'Gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. undergoing initial fit-out' and 'Gross square footage undergoing alteration' on PI Form 2: Project Summary Details?  Working on a first LEED CI v.2009 project and ran into a trouble with understanding the definition of the terms on LEED Online template.

Thanks!

64 Comments

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Oct 22 2012
LEEDuser Moderator

new PIf2 forum and resource page

Hello, LEEDuser now has a dedicate forum page for PIf2, where we hope to add other resources over time. If you have a question on PIf2, please post it there!

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Henrique Mendes Mr. Green Domus
Sep 14 2012
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Documenting parking capacity in PIf2

We are working on a New Building, located inside the company´s factory complex. Therefore, there will be no new parking spaces, since the project building is inside the company´s complex which already have plenty parking capacity. They´re asking me to provide documentation demonstrating the total parking capacity within the LEED-NC project boundary.

1) How can I explain that, even though the parking spaces are not inside the project boundary, the building users will be able to use the company´s previosly constructed parking lot?

2) How can I document the paking capacity if there is no upload area on PIf2?

Has anyone faced this issue?
Thanks

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Henrique Mendes Mr., Green Domus Sep 18 2012 Guest 898 Thumbs Up

Hello Everyone,
still haven´t solved problem described above.
We´ve tought of an alternative, describing at the aditional details, that the previosly constructed parking lot, even though isn´t in the Project boundary, it can be used by the building users, since it´s owned by the company, and it´s part of the company´s industry complex.
Is that allowed? Present this kind of explanation in the Aditional Details?

One other question that came up. Since our project building is located inside the company industry plant, and is part of a greater site boundary, should we mark it as a project located in a campus?

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Ward Miller Chief Environmental Officer, Alpenglow Advisory Sep 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 604 Thumbs Up

Hi Green Domus,
In terms of your first question, why are you trying to include the parking outside the boundary. Wouldn't it be easier to just say no new parking, which seems to be the case?

For your second question, what we usually do is simply write a note to the reviewer in the "Special Circumstances" section (just check the box and a field will open). This will also provide you with upload capacity to further clarify your situation.

In terms of your campus question I would say no unless your client intends on certifying other portions of the complex. You should read the Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, which can be found here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=10486 and this should give you a better idea. Hope this helps...

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Henrique Mendes Mr., Green Domus Sep 19 2012 Guest 898 Thumbs Up

Thank you Ward, it really helps.
We thought it´d be important to mention that the factory complex already have parking spaces, But I´ll change it, like you proposed. Will say that no new parking was created and only mention the previosly constructed parking lot in the Special Circumstances section.
Also thanks for the Application Guide link. Will read it right away!

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Malwina Mokrzycka
Jul 26 2012
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square footage of all parking areas

Hi everyone,
I would like to ask about 'square footage of all parking areas' on PI form 2: I am not sure which one I should choose square footage, gross or net? Im working on LEED 2009 for Core an Shell Development.

Thanks!

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Ann Wright Registered Architect Dean F. Unger, AIA, Inc.
Jul 23 2012
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P1 FORM 2, Item 10, Square footage of all parking areas

I cannot find the definition of parking area nor is it apparent why GBCI wants this data. Parking Area, for example, might include just the spaces or it might mean the spaces, backup areas and site circulation to and from the parking. I am working on a California Highway Patrol field station so the concept gets further distorted as does the parking area include the truck inspection area the fueling area, circulation into the auto shop, etc etc. Does anyone know what should be included? Does anyone know what this data is used for?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jul 23 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Ann, based on what you've said so far I would take the term literally and provide a measurement of the square footage of parking areas—and not include other hardscapeHardscape consists of the inanimate elements of the building landscaping. Examples include pavement, roadways, stone walls, concrete paths and sidewalks, and concrete, brick, and tile patios. areas that are not used for conventional parking, such as the areas you mention.

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Kyle Brunel DGA Jan 08 2013 Guest 8 Thumbs Up

Tristan, if you could please clarify your statement above... Does the SF of the parking area include the circulation path of travel to get to the parking spots or just the spots themselves?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 08 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Kyle, I would not just count the spots, but the whole parking lot. My comment to Ann was in light of unique circumstances she mentioned.

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Jens Glöggler Dipl.Ing ATP sustain
Jul 18 2012
LEEDuser Member
294 Thumbs Up

certification boundary

Hello,
I would like to ask some questions about the certification boundary.
1. A project of mixed use (retail+offices and hotel) is being certificated within 5 floors. The upper floors (hotel use) is excluded from the certification. How do I treat the boundary?
2. Same project: in the groundfloor a part of the lobby belongs to the hotel part, which is not included in the certification. Is it possible to exlude this one room from the certification?
3. A part of a building in an office complex is exluded from the certification. This time the separation is vertically. How do I treat the boundary?

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Amanda Ross Sustainability Coordinator/Architect, Wensley Architecture Oct 04 2012 LEEDuser Member 217 Thumbs Up

I'm not sure what rating system you're using, but for the rating systems for New Construction, Core & Shell, Schools, Retail – New Construction and Healthcare, you should be aware of MPR#2 (Minimum Program Requirement), which states,

"LEED projects must include the new, ground-up design and construction, or major renovation, of at least one commercial, institutional, or high-rise residential building in its entirety."

In other words "in its entirety" means that you can not exclude upper floors and lower floors, or even separate wings of the building. Alternatively, if you are applying for Core and Shell, you might approach the hotel area the same as a tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space.. Your LEED boundary would still include the whole building and all of the building shellThe exterior walls, roof, and lowest floor of a building, which serve to separate and protect the interior from the elements (precipitation, sunlight, wind, temperature variations)., but you would be able to exclude some of the hotel's interior work (like recycled content) from the certification.

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Dhanujie Jayapala Sustainability Executive MAS Active Trading Pvt Ltd
Jun 20 2012
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151 Thumbs Up

Multiple Buildings

Hi,
We are planning to apply LEED NC 2009 for a factory.
It basically has the Factory and a facility building adjacent to it.
There are other buildings like chreche, WWTP,waste storage area, security room and possibly a solar farm.
I have decide to go with both Factory & facility considering the entirety.
Which of these should be considered when calculating the building foot print?

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Chris DeVolder 360 Architecture
Jun 11 2012
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Defining "One Building"

I'm curious how others would interpret MRP 2 Must be a Complete Building or Space as it relates to an outdoor sports facility.
The facility has a series of 'buildings' that are connected (some contiguously) as a single 'super-structure' (to use USGBC's phrase).
Yet under the definition of gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. "covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces" are excluded. So if the concourse areas that connect all the areas of the stadium are excluded I'm wondering if it can still be considered a single 'building'?
Thanks!

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant Self Employed
Apr 23 2012
LEEDuser Member
478 Thumbs Up

Uploading Zip files?

Would it be acceptable to upload zip files that contain more than one document in it? Or is it preferable to upload documents one by one in Pdf, Excel, AutoCad, etc.? Are there limitations on the types of files that we can upload (AutoCad? Word?). Thank you!

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Emily Catacchio Sustainability Specialist, Wight and Company May 08 2012 Guest 8567 Thumbs Up

Diana,

Generally you should upload only the most universal file types. I would discourage you from uploading AutoCAD files as the review team could easily have issues viewing them (different versions of the program, etc.). I usually stick to PDFs and occationally a Word or Excel document. 

Hope that helps!

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant, Self Employed May 09 2012 LEEDuser Member 478 Thumbs Up

Emily,

Thank you for your message. Is it Ok to upload Zip files?

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Grace Ming Senior ESD Consultant May 10 2012 LEEDuser Member 827 Thumbs Up

Hi Diana,

Based on our previous project, Zip files are acceptable but autoCAD and .rar file formats are not supported by LEED Online at the moment. You can upload your documents in the following file formats which are currently supported by LEED Online: DOC, PDF, ZIP, JPG, or XLS.

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant, Self Employed May 14 2012 LEEDuser Member 478 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Grace!

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Justin Sack Crafton Tull
Mar 29 2012
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Project on Military base (or campus)...help

We have a project on a military base that must achieve LEED Silver and we are off to a rocky start with the recent return of our design credit submission. The project is New Construction (replacing an older building elsewhere on the base). there is no new parking provided with the project. All existing campus parking will be utilized by occupants. However, we will be taking (10) spaces from an adjacent lot and designated them for LEFE vehicles for our building. So, our project boundary includes the building and surrounding grounds, but excludes all parking since it is existing and not required per code or jurisdiction. We received comments stating that it is unclear how (10) parking spaces will support the occupancy of 320 peak users and why that parking has been excluded from the project boundary.

Has anyone experieced this on a similar project? What is the best way to address this...through a narrative, and additional site map showing all parking areas within the base (or campus). If none of the parking is new, is it wrong for us to exclude it from the project boundary?

Looking for some ideas, as this required form and boundary issue has a rippling affect throughout many LEED credits.

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant Self Employed
Mar 28 2012
LEEDuser Member
478 Thumbs Up

CI 2009: Site area vs footprint?

Just to confirm: total site area within the LEED project boundary - is it the total square footage of all floors in a building plus the surrounding premises? Or is it the footprint of the building and its premises?
Thank you!

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Apr 18 2012 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

The site area would be the building footprintBuilding footprint is the area on a project site used by the building structure, defined by the perimeter of the building plan. Parking lots, parking garages, landscapes, and other nonbuilding facilities are not included in the building footprint. and surounding areas at grade that are within the LEED boundary. In CI this is usually only entered if you are pursuing SSc1 to get credit for the site performance (stormwater, landscaping, light pollution, brownfieldAbandoned, idled, or under used industrial and commercial facilities/sites who expansion, redevelopment, or reuse is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination (may include hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants). They can be in urban, suburban, or rural areas. EPA's Brownfields initiative helps communities mitigate potential health risks and restore the economic vitality of such areas or properties. (EPA) , etc) or SSc2 for the proximity of your site to urban density/ services.

The total square footage of all floors is entered in the "Gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. of the building in which the project is located."

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Diana Nezamutinova Consultant, Self Employed Apr 19 2012 LEEDuser Member 478 Thumbs Up

David,

Thank you for your answer. We are indeed pursuing SSc1 and SSc2. It's good to confirm that it is Ok to have site area be less than the building area.

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Tyra Sorensen
Mar 20 2012
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603 Thumbs Up

NC 2009 MPR Form 2 - actual vs estimated square footage

Under Gross Square FootageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. designed to be regularly occupied the pull down offers Actual or Estimated.
In this case does Actual mean built and estimated is the take off from the drawing?

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Tyra Sorensen Apr 11 2012 Guest 603 Thumbs Up

What defines Actual or Estimated square footage in this context?

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JOHANNA SENOTT Architect / Environmental adviser, EA Energia y Arquitectura Sep 24 2013 LEEDuser Member 889 Thumbs Up

Anyone? :)

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 03 2013 LEEDuser Moderator

Johanna, this forum has been mothballed in favor of our newer, more fully functional PI form forums. Please see the link at the top of the page.

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Josep Escarra Energy consultant ERF, Estudi Ramon Folch i Associats
Mar 13 2012
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175 Thumbs Up

Parking in basement

Good morning,

We are working on a 22 story office project. The building has also 3 stories below grade that mixed parking (250 parking spaces) and other uses (Auditorium, etc.). According to the LEED User Glossary, the total Gross Square FootageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. must include all basements levels. Does that include the underground parking levels as well on a New Construction Project?
And How we count "number of stories below grade excludingg parking" (at PI FORM 2) if we have 3 stories below grade, 1 only parking use and 2 with differents uses: parking, auditorium, storage, changing rooms, etc.

Thany you very much,

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Kevin Flynn President, AIA, LEED FELLOW (LEED AP BD&C), EcoDEEP Feb 21 2013 LEEDuser Member 239 Thumbs Up

Josep - The area devoted to parking garages may not be included in the gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. of the building.

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Sue Barnett Principal Sue Barnett Sustainable Design
Feb 01 2012
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1150 Thumbs Up

"Gross square footage undergoing initial fit-out"

what's the difference between "Gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. undergoing initial fit-out" vs "Gross square footage undergoing alteration"? I can not find these terms in the Reference Guide, nor on LEEDonline...
thanks

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Sue, "facility alterations" has a specific definition, at least in the context of LEED-EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems.. See the FAQ's section of the EBOM MRc3 page for more.

If that is what the form is looking for, then I think fit-out would be the opposite of alteration -- a more complete renovation project.

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MM K
Jan 31 2012
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1824 Thumbs Up

Omitting an area from the building

We are certifying an office building and there is one retail space at the ground floor of the building that the project team wants to omit from LEED certification. Can this be achieved? How?

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Jan 31 2012 LEEDuser Expert 9341 Thumbs Up

Michael, if the retail space represents less than 10% of the total building gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features., it can be exempted from the LEED certification documentation. If it is more than that, it (or some portion thereof) must be included. Excluding spaces can get messy and confusing, if not downright contradictory, for many prerequisites and credits (EAp2 and EQp2 come to mind immediately), but the key is the fraction of the building under consideration. There is more detail on this topic to be found in the Introduction to the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. Reference Guide.
Hope that helps,
Dan

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MM K Feb 02 2012 Guest 1824 Thumbs Up

Dan,
Many thanks for your reply.
Is this applicable for all leed rating systems?
We are using the Core & Shell rating system.
How do we mention we omitted space in the forms?

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Vernal Group The Vernal Group
Dec 21 2011
LEEDuser Member
53 Thumbs Up

EBOM 2009 PI Form 2

Does anybody know why this form wants a breakdown of new construction, existing renovated, and existing unrenovated? We are working on a 20 year old building, and over 20 years I am sure that various tenants have come and gone, and that walls or ducts have changed over time. My question: how is USGBC using this information? I could guess at the square feet that have been renovated over time, but it seems irrelevent (?). Thank you, I could not find another thread on this.

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Dan Ackerstein Principal, Ackerstein Sustainability, LLC Dec 21 2011 LEEDuser Expert 9341 Thumbs Up

As I understand it, this breakdown relates to activity on the building during the performance period, rather than over its entire lifetime. That's the only relevant piece of information they could possibly be asking for. The other possibility is that PIForm 2 was originally designed for BD&C and simply carried over to EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. without too much asking about how applicable that information was to an existing building project. . .

Hope that helps,

Dan

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Vernal Group The Vernal Group Dec 28 2011 LEEDuser Member 53 Thumbs Up

Thank you, Dan. I will proceed based on that logical assumption.

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ola shunnar
Dec 04 2011
Guest
214 Thumbs Up

LEED V4

I am wondering about LEED v4, when its come up? and could I register the project under V3 even there is a V4??

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Susan Walter Sr Project Architect, Wilmot/Sanz Dec 05 2011 LEEDuser Expert 17506 Thumbs Up

If you are referring to the next version of LEED (called LEED 2012 on this site), then you would be able to upgrade a LEED v3 project to the newer version when it is balloted and approved. There are some limitations on whether you can do the upgrade, for example, you can't move to the newer program after your project has submitted the design review.

If you are talking about version 4 forms in LEED Online, you can request the upgrade directly from the GBCI. Each generation of LEED Online forms is know by a number and 4 is the current form number.

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ola shunnar
Nov 22 2011
Guest
214 Thumbs Up

we have a training ceter

we have a training ceter building and would like to register it under the CI, and my question is on the MPR, form 2: there is two phrases in the form that make me confused, which are the a) Project Gross area, and b) Building Gross area, I know what is GSA, but when it related to Project and building makes me confused

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Nov 22 2011 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

With LEED CI the project you certify is often a smaller part of a whole building.
For example, a company is moving into a renovated office on two floors of a 10 story building. Lets assume they are renting this space in the office building, and are not renovating the bathrooms and corridor around the elevator on these two floors.
The Building Gross Area includes all 10 floors of the whole building including ground floor lobby maintenance rooms, service areas, etc. The Project Gross Area only includes the renovated office area on the two floors that the company is renting. It would not include the common areas of those floors such as elevator, bathrooms, and maintenance closets, etc, because those were not renovated for this project.

Sometimes a CI project will occupy all floors of a building. In that case the Gross Project area would be almost as large as the Building Gross Area, but often there are common areas or maintenance areas that are not being renovated as part of the LEED project. These would not be part of the Gross Building Area, but not part of the Project Gross Area.
Does that explain the phrases for your situation?

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ola shunnar Nov 23 2011 Guest 214 Thumbs Up

Thank you David

But there is not understood; you mentioned that "Sometimes a CI project will occupy all floors of a building. In that case the Gross Project area would be almost as large as the Building Gross Area, but often there are common areas or maintenance areas that are not being renovated as part of the LEED project. These would not be part of the Gross Building Area, but not part of the Project Gross Area" and in my case the whole building (3 stories) is renovated, and I think the Gross project and Building are the same??? and we will register the whole building as LEED CI, SO doese the Gross Building area includes only the renovated parts, while the Gross Project includes renovated and not renovated parts.??

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Nov 23 2011 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

Thanks for clarifying your situation. The Gross Building Area is the whole building: both renovated and non-renovated parts. The Gross Project Area is only the renovated parts.

If you are renovating the whole building, I'm wondering if LEED CI is the right rating system. Usually LEED NC is used for major renovations. Is there a reason you are using CI? When people have trouble deciding which rating system to use there are two resources that can help:

1) The LEED Rating System Selection Policy
http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6667

2) LEED Online version 3
You can start to register a LEED project and not finish the registration, so it won't cost anything.
-- Click the "Register a New Project" button
-- At Step 2 of the Rating System Selection choose "I'm not sure which rating system to use."
-- When you get about 6 questions further, (after it asks about the number of projects, whether it is neighborhood, etc) you will reach a question about "Construction Scope."
-- If you have a "Major Renovation" of more than 60% of the building, this takes you to LEED NC after a few more questions.
What's a Major Renovation?
-- If you are renovating interior walls, ceilings, finishes, and just moving HVAC ducts and lighting, this is called an Alteration, and uses LEED CI.
-- If you are also making changes to the building roof, exterior, windows, structure, or replacing any major HVAC equipment such as boiler, chiller, heaters, etc, than it is a Major Renovation and uses NC. (These terms are all defined in the Glossary of the MPR Supplemental Guidance.)

Take a look at those resources and post back here if you hav any more questions.

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ola shunnar Nov 27 2011 Guest 214 Thumbs Up

Thank you David;

you made me think more in my project!!!...the Engineering Training center (owned by Engineering Association.) that we are pursuing LEED is Existing Building and we are doing renovation and alteration of interior walls, decoration, HVAC systems, Water and Energy system, and it is still occupied (there are many training courses that could not be postponed under renovation), as your answer the project could not be CI, it has to be NC with major renovation???,

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ola shunnar Nov 27 2011 Guest 214 Thumbs Up

1. We are pursuing LEED for CI, but am not sure if it is CI or could be a NC with a major renovation, since the project is existing building with the following features:
The project is a Training Center (owned by Jordanian Engineering Association) with three stories, it is still occupied (there are many implementing training courses) by trainees and staff along with alterations of decorative materials, windows, and renovation (changing all HVAC systems, water and energy systems), so by definition of both CI and NC we are still confused of which rating system is suitable for the project.
2. We pursuing low emitting, recycled…etc credits and the materials Cut Sheet are rarely found, could we sign the credits without these Cut Sheets.
3. Could we submit the Lease Ownership Proof in Arabic Language or it must be translated to English Language.
4. Some credits need representative photos that are dated, and in our case the photos are not dated, could we submit them without date.

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markus bolp Jan 10 2012 Guest 85 Thumbs Up

Does anyone know if property records require proof of type of renovation? We are looking into a particular property that seems to meet qualifications, but have yet to track down paper work(Communication with current owners is a whole ordeal, so clarity there may answer all questions).
The clarification on "major innovation" above is very helpful. Thanks.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jan 10 2012 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

Ola, there are some situations where either CI or NC could be used, such as when you are close to the definition of a Major Renovation. It's not a strict rule that your project can only qualify for one rating system. You have the flexibility to decide which one makes the most sense here. If the building is going to be more than half occupied during the work, it sounds like CI may be a better choice.
If you don't have cut sheets, you will need some kind of official letter from the product manufacturer or supplier to verify the % of recycled content, VOC emissions, etc. These and other supporting documents do need to be in English for the GBCI reviewers. You can try to submit photos without dates, but I don't know how strict the review will be.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jan 10 2012 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

Markus,
I haven't seen projects being asked for proof of renovation type. Often there are some permit documents or construction drawings that define the limits of the work being done, so that has usually been enough.

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ola shunnar
Nov 19 2011
Guest
214 Thumbs Up

what is the difference between? and how could i measure???

what is the difference between the Gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. undergoing initial fit-out; gross floor areaGross floor area (based on ASHRAE definition) is the sum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building, including basements, mezzanine and intermediate‐floored tiers, and penthouses wi th headroom height of 7.5 ft (2.2 meters) or greater. Measurements m ust be taken from the exterior 39 faces of exterior walls OR from the centerline of walls separating buildings, OR (for LEED CI certifying spaces) from the centerline of walls separating spaces. Excludes non‐en closed (or non‐enclosable) roofed‐over areas such as exterior covered walkways, porches, terraces or steps, roof overhangs, and similar features. Excludes air shafts, pipe trenches, and chimneys. Excludes floor area dedicated to the parking and circulation of motor vehicles. ( Note that while excluded features may not be part of the gross floor area, and therefore technically not a part of the LEED project building, they may still be required to be a part of the overall LEED project and subject to MPRs, prerequisites, and credits.); Gross square footage undergoing alteration; Gross square footage not undergoing initial fit-out or alteration work; Percentage undergoing initial fit-out; Gross square footage of the building in which the project is located;
how could I fill Table PIf3-1. Space Usage Type??

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 19 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Ola, if you roll over the green text above for each of those terms, GSF, and GFA, you'll see definitions that should show the difference between them. I think those definitions provide a basis for your other questions.

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ola shunnar Nov 20 2011 Guest 214 Thumbs Up

Thank you Tristan

But I still wondering about the
1) initial fit out
2) the percentage of alteration work
3) can you provide me with a samples showing me how could I fill the MPR templates (Pif 1-5)

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 20 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Ola, I think those figures depend on the scope of your project, right?

I'm sorry but I don't currently have an example of those forms.

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Steve Khouw Principal DNA GreenDesign
Jul 15 2011
Guest
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CI Project in two buildings

Need guidance, not sure whether we have to register as 1 project or 2 here. We have a project whereby the tenancy space involves 1 building of 8 floors and the adjacent building of 3 floors. It has been suggested that we should register the two buildings as two separate LEED-CI projects due to definition of MPR. But I would though it matters not how many buildings the CI project lies, it is still a CI project nevertheless, here it is not exactly a campus.

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jul 15 2011 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

It is a bit of a grey area, but the relevant sections of the new MPR guidance from June 2011 appears to be page 18 and the top of page 21.

It looks like it may be possible to register it as one CI project if you meet the conditions a thru f: (unreasonable to draw boundary at party walls, it is a single construction contract, you are certifying all of the work, clear boundaries and signage, etc) To meet condition F - not create an difficult review process - you would probably need to show that you are doing identical or very similar work in the spaces that are in different buildings. In general, if it is treated as one project, the information you fill out for a credit form needs to be true for the spaces in both buildings. If the two buildings have very different energy use, different ventilation systems, different lighting power densities, etc, it going to be hard to document it as a single project.

If the buildings or improvements being done are significantly different, you probably will need to treat it as a campus, or at least use the "Block" function so that you get the same reviewer for both projects and can cross-reference shared project information.

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Steve Khouw Principal, DNA GreenDesign Jul 17 2011 Guest 2296 Thumbs Up

Thank you, David. The intent and purpose of the space is the same, just that one building selected in the estate is insufficient to accommodate all the occupants so had to be spilled over to the adjoining building, which is identical in core & shell and base building lighting and HVAC infrastructure.

So I imagine we can register as one LEED-CI project.

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Ghaith Moufarege
Jan 26 2011
LEEDuser Member
8948 Thumbs Up

Total Gross Square Footage: Definition

Hello,

According to the LEED User Glossary, the total Gross Square FootageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. must include all basements levels. Does that include the underground parking levels as well? If so, does that mean that i have to include parking areas when undertaking the FTEFull-time equivalent (FTE) represents a regular building occupant who spends 8 hours a day (40 hours a week) in the project building. Part-time or overtime occupants have FTE values based on their hours per day divided by 8 (or hours per week divided by 40). Transient Occupants can be reported as either daily totals or as part of the FTE. Residential occupancy should be estimated based on the number and size of units. Core and Shell projects should refer to the default occupancy table in the Reference Guide appendix. All occupant assumptions must be consistent across all credits in all categories./Transients calculations on a Core & Shell project ?

Many thanks,

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jan 26 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

George, from Appendix 1 of the BD&C Reference Guide, page 612: "Projects which contain underground and/or structured parking, may exclude that area from the gross square footageSum of the floor areas of the spaces within the building including basements, mezzanine and intermediate-floored tiers, and penthouses with headroom height of 7.5 ft or greater. It is measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls or from the centerline of walls separating buildings, but excluding covered walkways, open roofed-over areas, porches and similar spaces, pipe trenches, exterior terraces or steps, chimneys, roof overhangs, and similar features. used for the [occupancy count] calculation."

I think this answers your question.

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Michael Dulcich
Jan 06 2011
Guest
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GSF not part of initial fit-out or alteration - PI form 2

What is an example of GSF not part of an initial fit-out or an alteration? Would it include any of the core/exist mechanical spaces?
We have a core & shell where we are doing the initial fit-out for the entire floor...does this mean I sould put 100% of the GSF down as initial fit-out?-or do I subtract the core's GSF from my total number?

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David Posada Sustainability Manager, SS TAG member, GBD Architects Jan 11 2011 LEEDuser Expert 19055 Thumbs Up

I'm assuming you're asking about the CI - 2009 form. I've not seen this used, but imagine it might apply if you are including a space in the LEED project area because it is part of the tenant's leased area but may not be undergoing renovation. Perhaps a storage room, work room, or other support space is being re-used from the previous tenant's plan without being altered. Since it is part of the overall office area, you'd want to include it in the project boundary, but use this form field to distinguish that area from other areas undergoing alteration.

If you are pursuing LEED CI, the core areas such as elevators & lobbies, common restrooms, mechanical rooms, would not typically be included in the LEED project boundary since those are not the tenant spaceTenant space is the area within the LEED project boundary. For more information on what can and must be in the LEED project boundary see the Minimum Program Requirements (MPRs) and LEED 2009 MPR Supplemental Guidance. Note: tenant space is the same as project space. and are typically a different scope of work. Hope that explains it.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability SHP Leading Design
Jul 12 2010
LEEDuser Expert
6697 Thumbs Up

"Initial fit-out" would be if

"Initial fit-out" would be if you are the first tenant in a new core and shell building, meaning there are no already existing interior walls, finishes, etc. Undergoing alteration would be if you are not the first tenant, so you are modifying an existing tenant fit-out that has walls, finishes, etc. already in place. These two values determine if you can attempt MRc1.2 for building reuse.

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John Albrecht Director of LEED Services, Sieben Energy Assoc. Sep 06 2010 Guest 2396 Thumbs Up

We have a CI build-out project in a previously undeveloped space in an exising office building. The bulk of the work is within the office new build-out but there is some minor ancillary work in the common areas-- restrooms (new aerators) and the mechanical rooms (add'l. HVAC equipment).

It is my understanding that the 'total project gross SF' can be limited to the new office buildoutThe time at which all habitable buildings on the project are complete and ready for occupancy. areas per the lease, or must we also include any ancillary common space outside the lease in which minor work occurs?

This would obviously impact numerous credits and I can't find this discussed in the CI Refer. Guide so your guidance is appareciated, thanks, John

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Editorial Director – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Sep 06 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

My assumption would be that you don't need to include the restrooms and mechanical rooms in the square footage, but you'll need to include those fixtures and equipment in credits that take into account the tenant scope of work.

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John Albrecht Director of LEED Services, Sieben Energy Assoc. Sep 07 2010 Guest 2396 Thumbs Up

Tristan, thanks again.

Do you know if this info is in the Ref. Guide or is it something you've learned thru project experience? It seems like it could be a common question for a CI project.

And I really appreciate LEEDuser--keep up the good work.

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Allison Beer McKenzie Architect, Director of Sustainability, SHP Leading Design Sep 20 2010 LEEDuser Expert 6697 Thumbs Up

John- we received guidance from a certification team that is very similar to what Tristan wrote about. I have not, however, found this info in writing in any official USGBC/GBCI documents.

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