Project Boundary - New Building linked to an Existing Building

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Architect DKA Apr 02 2010 LEEDuser Member
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If a new building is linked or connected to an existing building (not necessarily an addition) and that link requires some modification to the existing building:

1. How do you determine the Project Boundary?  Should it include the entire existing building or none of it? 

2.  What if the building is an addition (structurally and functionally) but maintains separate HVAC systems? 

3.  Does the Energy Model have to include the unrenovated building?   Does this differ in above scenarios 1 and 2...? 

LEEDuser Forum Moderator's Note: We now have a dedicated forum on setting a project boundary under our MPR3 page, along with guidance there. Please post your questions on this topic there. Thanks!

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Max Neu
Dec 12 2016
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Addition to Existing Leed EBOM Building

Project Location: United States

Forgive me if this has been answered, I searched all over and can't find a definitive answer.

We're kicking off a major expansion to a facility that is already LEED Silver under the EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. rating system. What affect will this have on their existing LEED Rating? Do we need to go through a LEED NC certification process for the new part of the building?

Thanks!

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Lauren Ford Project Architect Cooper Carry
Sep 13 2011
LEEDuser Member
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Attached Buidlings/LEED Project Boundary

We have an existing parcel of land with one small existing restaurant on it (not LEED Certified). We are building a large hotel/inn (that will pursue LEED NC Certification) on the same parcel that will be attached to the restaurant. The two buidlings will have seperate identities and signage. There is an opening such that you can move from the new buidling to the old, but otherwise, all systems are seperate - HVAC, Electric, structural, etc. Except for some minor painting, there is no renovation scope within the existing building. Per my review of the MPR Supplemental Guidance, we should not include the existing building within our project boundary. However, I am not certain how to treat the site. The site is shared by the two buidings and has outdoor recreational areas with walking paths and an outdoor pavilion. As I read it, we have two options. We can draw our boundary to break the site in two pieces, including only site area impacted by construction but not including site areas that "support normal building operation." Or we could certify the whole site as a "campus boundary" per AGMBC and then define another project boundary within the campus boundary as indicated above. But it is not clear to me which approach is appropriate - or are both acceptable?

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David Posada Integrated Design & LEED Specialist, SERA Architects Nov 14 2011 Guest 21445 Thumbs Up

Yes, you could follow the latest AGMBC guidance which allows you to exclude a building from the campus boundary, but that seems more touble than it is worth since that leaves only one building, the hotel. Not much of a campus there. In your case, the connection between the restaurant and hotel doesn't sound that important, especially since all other systems are separate.
I dont have all the guidelines in front of me, but you could try starting with the assumption that you'll exclude the existing restaurant and only certify the new hotel. Set aside a portion of the site for the restaurant and exclude that from the hotel's LEED boundary. Make sure the number of parking spaces set aside is appropriate to serve the restaurant; this may be set by the zoning code. Then go back through the most recent MPR Supplemental Guidance and see if the new site boundary makes sense or causes any conflicts with the MPRs. Post back here if you see any red flags, or if that works for your scenario.

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Dustin Campbell Sustainability Analyst ETC Group
Aug 23 2011
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LEED NC Addition Project Boundary Guidelines

After reading the MPR, and the MPR Supplemental Guidance from June 2011, I still have the same question that Tony mentioned above:

"2. What if the building is an addition (structurally and functionally) but
maintains separate HVAC systems? "

Can a LEED NC project boundary for an addition include the existing building to which the addition will be attached? Must there be some criteria that are met in order to do so (such as major renovation to the existing building)? Or is the only option to have LEED NC for new construction only, and draw the boundary where the NC is connected to the existing building?

Details: The existing building is not LEED EB. The NC will add over 100% square footage to the whole building. Thanks.

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Dustin Campbell Sustainability Analyst, ETC Group Aug 24 2011 Guest 160 Thumbs Up

I should also mention: the new construction addition is currently seeking LEED NC, with the project boundary as just the NC portion. So, the question really is: can the project boundary CHANGE to include the existing building, so that the whole building can pursue LEED NC?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Nov 13 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Chad, yes, in fact the MPRs encourage you to include the whole building, not just the addition, in your project boundary.

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virginia waik Solutions Director EDesignC
Jun 02 2011
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Simple Tips on Defining a Project Boundary

I am curious about the dos and don'ts of defining a project boundary for our whole bulding LEED NC v3 project. The existing building will double in size to 9600 sq ft and is surrounded by a busy port terminal area comprized of two parcels (ea about 8 acres). Our project bridges the two parcels of vast asphalt. The project will include redoing two street entrances, the streetside sidewalk between them, adding property front landscape, and trenching to a near by emergency generator for emergency power. Is it too simplistic to think that we can define our project boundary as being bounded by the street front curb inclusive of the two street entrances, and then simply creating the smallest boundary we can that includes the outside edges of the building, the generator, and the parking stalls?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 08 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Virginia, are you familiar with the LEED MPR supplemental guidance? This gives some useful (and binding) pointers on what to include and not include in a situation like yours.

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Mark Taake United Excel Design Dec 18 2012 Guest 108 Thumbs Up

Our project consists of multiple discrete renovation areas within a large hospital; the intent is to register it under LEED CI, rather than healthcare, since the project is not a complete gut/rebuild.
I've seen multiple discussion references onsite to the LEED boundary needing to be inclusive of areas which "support" the actual renovation area but which are beyond the limits of construction. However, I've been unable to find where this is explicitly set forth. Can you point me to the defining text? Thank you.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser BuildingGreen, Inc.
Apr 05 2010
LEEDuser Moderator

Check LEED's Minimum Program Requirements

Tony, I think the place you need to start to answer this set of questions for your project is with LEED's Minimum Program Requirements. We have a guidance page on the MPRs here, and I think you would also get some perspective from this discussion about setting the site boundary.

It seems quite likely that your site boundary will need to include the entire building; thus this would be included in your energy model for LEED EAc1 and in all of your credit calculations.

Feel free to post back with follow-up thoughts or questions.

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Karen Anderson LEED program manager, Montgomery County Public Schools Oct 13 2010 LEEDuser Member 338 Thumbs Up

As a school system, we are talking to USGBC about attaching a large modernization (all new construction) to a small, recently-built wing or gym and about whether we can exclude the existing-to-remain from the LEED boundary. When we get some guidance, will be happy to share what we learn.

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Oct 15 2010 LEEDuser Moderator

Very interesting. Do keep us posted.

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Karen Anderson LEED program manager, Montgomery County Public Schools Jan 31 2011 LEEDuser Member 338 Thumbs Up

Folks: We met with USGBC and GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). and expressed our concerns that LEED 2009 school projects that were connecting to a recent addition (classroom wing or gym) not part of the modernization would fail to meet Minimum Program Requirements that a project be all one building. Following is the reasonable response we got:

"RE Minimum Program Requirements

a. I am happy to report that my recollection of forthcoming revisions to the Supplemental Guidance with respect to additions requiring a separate name and address was correct - a separate address will not be required for addition projects. Please continue to use a unique name for your LEED projects and provide signage to indicate the existing portions of the building that were excluded from the LEED submission.

b. I have also discussed the concern expressed regarding the relative size of the new addition with respect to the existing building with colleagues in the LEED department – again, provided the project scope is clearly communicated to the occupants there are currently no restrictions on the size of an addition.

c. As we discussed, LEED for Schools is a whole building rating system and does not permit certification of partial buildings – additions are the only exception. As such, the specific examples discussed during our meeting, discrete wings of an existing building remaining (no renovation of the existing portion) with a clear junction between the LEED building and the non-LEED spaces, will meet the MPRs. If renovation work is undertaken within the existing portion of the building as part of the construction of the new addition, then those existing spaces would need to be included within the LEED Project Boundary and the whole building addressed in all prerequisites and credits."

We are planning to post signs on the non-touched part of the school explaining that the LEED rating does not apply to this area.

Karen

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Aliesa Adelman Sustainability Program Manager, Wendel Jun 01 2011 LEEDuser Member 733 Thumbs Up

We have any 51,100 sqft building that we are building a 10,900 addition onto. There will be circulation (through doors) between the two buildings, although there will be separate HVAC systems. Site work is included in the scope and in phase 1 (we are in phase 2) a large portion of the existing buidling's roof was remediated and replaced. Are we able to use LEED NC even though the addition is only 20% of the total building (includes the exisiting building)or certify just the addition? If this is not possible, is LEED EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. our only option?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Jun 08 2011 LEEDuser Moderator

Aliesa, it seems as though EBOMEBOM is an acronym for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance, one of the LEED 2009 rating systems. is your only option according to the LEED rating system selection guidance. However, if you feel strongly that you want to use NC, I suppose it's possible GBCIThe Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) manages Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building certification and professional accreditation processes. It was established in 2008 with support from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). would allow it—you would need to get their okay.

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Jordan Friedberg Feb 03 2012 Guest 677 Thumbs Up

What if the addition was closer to 45-47% of the existing building? Most of the addition will have its own HVAC, though part of the addition will expand an existing space and so use the same building systems. Is this more appropriate as a major renovation or EB?

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Tristan Roberts LEED AP BD+C, Executive Editor – LEEDuser, BuildingGreen, Inc. Feb 17 2012 LEEDuser Moderator

Jordan, it sounds to me like a major renovation. although you are in the 40/60 range where you have some choice, according to the selection guidance.

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